Woodbridge Township, New Jersey

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Woodbridge Township, New Jersey
Township of Woodbridge
Jonathan Singletary Dunham House
Official seal of Woodbridge Township, New Jersey
Seal
Map of Woodbridge Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Woodbridge Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Woodbridge Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Woodbridge Township, New Jersey
Woodbridge is located in Middlesex County, New Jersey
Woodbridge
Woodbridge
Location in Middlesex County
Woodbridge is located in New Jersey
Woodbridge
Woodbridge
Location in New Jersey
Woodbridge is located in the United States
Woodbridge
Woodbridge
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°34′N 74°17′W / 40.56°N 74.29°W / 40.56; -74.29
Latitude and Longitude:

40°34′N 74°17′W / 40.56°N 74.29°W / 40.56; -74.29
[1]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Middlesex
Settled1664
CharteredJune 1, 1669
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forJohn W. Woodbridge
Government
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • BodyTownship Council
 •  Mayor John McCormac ( D, term ends December 31, 2023) [2] [3]
 •  AdministratorVito Cimilluca [4]
 •  Municipal clerkJohn M. Mitch [5]
Area
 • Total63.473 km2 (24.507 sq mi)
 • Land60.122 km2 (23.213 sq mi)
 • Water3.350 km2 (1.294 sq mi)  5.28%
Area rank112th of 566 in state
5th of 25 in county [1]
Elevation18 m (59 ft)
Population
 • Total99,585
 • Estimate 
(2019) [11]
100,145
 • Rank6th of 566 in state
2nd of 25 in county [12]
 • Density1,656.4/km2 (4,290.0/sq mi)
 • Density rank138th of 566 in state
11th of 25 in county [12]
Time zone UTC−05:00 ( Eastern (EST))
 • Summer ( DST) UTC−04:00 ( Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Codes
07001 - Avenel [13]
07064 - Port Reading [14]
07067 - Colonia [15]
07077 - Sewaren [16]
07095 - Woodbridge [17]
08830 - Iselin [18]
08832 - Keasbey [19]
08840 - Menlo Park Terrace [20]
08861 - Hopelawn [21]
08863 - Fords [22] [23]
Area code 732 [24]
FIPS code [1] [7] [25] 34-82000 [26]
GNIS ID [1] [7] [25] 882165
Website www.twp.woodbridge.nj.us

Woodbridge Township is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 99,585, [8] [9] [10] reflecting an increase of 2,382 (+2.5%) from the 97,203 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,117 (+4.4%) from the 93,086 counted in the 1990 Census. [27] Woodbridge was the sixth-most-populous municipality in New Jersey in 2000 and 2010. [28] Woodbridge hosts the intersection of the New Jersey Turnpike and the Garden State Parkway, the two busiest highways in the state, and also serves as the headquarters for the New Jersey Turnpike Authority. [29]

According to Joshua Coffin, the early settlers included "Captain John Pike, the ancestor of General Zebulon Montgomery Pike, who was killed at the battle of Queenstown in 1813; Thomas Bloomfield, the ancestor of Joseph Bloomfield, some years governor of New Jersey, for whom the township of Bloomfield, New Jersey is named; John Bishop, senior and junior; Jonathan Haynes; Henry Jaques; George March; Stephen Kent; Abraham Toppan, junior; Elisha Ilsley; Hugh March; John Bloomfield; Samuel Moore; Nathaniel Webster; John Ilsley; and others." [30] Woodbridge was the site of the first gristmill in New Jersey. [31] [32] The mill was built by Jonathan Singletary Dunham (married to Mary Bloomfield, relative of Joseph Bloomfield). [33] [34]

History

The Township of Woodbridge is the oldest original township in New Jersey and was granted a royal charter on June 1, 1669, by King Charles II of England. [35] It was reincorporated on October 31, 1693. Woodbridge Township was incorporated by the Township Act of 1798 of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as part of the initial group of 104 townships incorporated in the state under the Township Act. Portions of the township were taken to form Rahway (April 19, 1858), Raritan Township (March 17, 1870, now Edison Township) and Roosevelt (April 11, 1906, now Carteret). [36] [37] The township is named after Reverend John W. Woodbridge (1613–1696) of Newbury, Massachusetts, who settled in the future township in 1664. [35] [38]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 24.507 square miles (63.473 km2), including 23.213 square miles (60.122 km2) of land and 1.294 square miles (3.350 km2) of water (5.28%). [1] [39]

The township borders Carteret, Edison, Perth Amboy and Sayreville in Middlesex County; Clark, Linden and Rahway in Union County. Its border with the borough of Staten Island in New York City is in the Arthur Kill. [40] [41] [42]

Area codes 732 and 848 are used in Woodbridge. [24]

Communities

There are distinct communities within Woodbridge Township. Several of these communities have their own ZIP Codes, and many are listed by the United States Census Bureau as census-designated places (CDPs), but they are all unincorporated communities and neighborhoods within the Township that, together, make up Woodbridge Township.

Avenel (with 2010 Census population of 17,011 [43]), Colonia (17,795 [44]), Fords (15,187 [45]), Iselin (18,695 [46]), Port Reading (3,728 [47]), Sewaren (2,756 [48]), Woodbridge Proper (19,265 [49]) are census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within Woodbridge Township. [50] [51]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include: [52] Boynton Beach, Demarest Hill Top, Edgars, Fairfield, Hazelton, Hopelawn, Keasbey, Lynn Woodoaks, Menlo Park Terrace,[ citation needed], Ostrander, Saint Stephens, Sand Hills, Shore View, Union and Woodbridge Oaks. [53]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
17903,520
18104,247
18204,226−0.5%
18303,969−6.1%
18404,82121.5%
18505,1416.6%
18603,987*−22.4%
18703,717*−6.8%
18804,09910.3%
18904,66513.8%
19007,63163.6%
19108,948*17.3%
192013,42350.0%
193025,26688.2%
194027,1917.6%
195035,75831.5%
196078,846120.5%
197098,94425.5%
198090,074−9.0%
199093,0863.3%
200097,2034.4%
201099,5852.5%
Est. 2019100,145 [11] [54] [55]0.6%
Population sources: 1790-1920 [56]
1810-1930 [57] 1840 [58] 1850-1870 [59]
1850 [60] 1870 [61] 1880-1890 [62]
1890-1910 [63] 1910-1930 [64]
1930-1990 [65] 2000 [66] [67] 2010 [8] [9] [10]
* = Lost territory since previous census.

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census counted 99,585 people, 34,615 households, and 25,753.560 families in the township. The population density was 4,290.0 per square mile (1,656.4/km2). There were 36,124 housing units at an average density of 1,556.2 per square mile (600.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 59.18% (58,935) White, 9.85% (9,810) Black or African American, 0.32% (321) Native American, 22.42% (22,324) Asian, 0.04% (39) Pacific Islander, 5.28% (5,254) from other races, and 2.91% (2,902) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.63% (15,562) of the population. [8]

The 34,615 households accounted 33.6% with children under the age of 18 living with them; 57.2% were married couples living together; 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.6% were non-families. Of all households, 21.4% were made up of individuals, and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.27. [8]

In the township, the population age was spread out with 21.6% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.6 years. For every 100 females, the population had 98.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 98.0 males. [8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $79,277 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,537) and the median family income was $88,656 (+/- $2,537). Males had a median income of $60,139 (+/- $1,971) versus $46,078 (+/- $1,635) for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,144 (+/- $717). About 3.8% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.9% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over. [68]

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census [69] there were 97,203 people, 34,562 households, and 25,437 families residing in the township. The population density was 4,224.5 people per square mile (1,631.0/km2). There were 35,298 housing units at an average density of 1,534.1/sq mi (592.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 70.83% White, 8.75% African American, 0.17% Native American, 14.46% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 3.30% from other races, and 2.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.21% of the population. [66] [67]

As of the 2000 Census, 9.19% of Woodbridge Township's residents identified themselves as being of Indian American ancestry, which was the tenth-highest of any municipality in the United States and the fifth highest in New Jersey — behind Edison (17.75%), Plainsboro Township (16.97%), Piscataway Township (12.49%) and South Brunswick Township (10.48%) — of all places with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry. [70]

There were 34,562 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.1% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.4% were non-families. 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.19. [66] [67]

In the township the population was spread out with 22.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 34.8% from 25 to 44, 22.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.0 males. [66] [67]

The median income for a household in the township was $60,683, and the median income for a family was $68,492. Males had a median income of $49,248 versus $35,096 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,087. About 3.2% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.7% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over. [66] [67]

Economy

Woodbridge Center, with a gross leasable area of 1,633,000 square feet (151,700 m2), [71] is the third-biggest mall in New Jersey, behind Westfield Garden State Plaza and Freehold Raceway Mall. [72]

Wakefern Food Corporation, owner of ShopRite, has its headquarters in Keasbey in the township. [73] [74] Woodbridge has authorized dispensaries for the sale of medical marijuana. [75]

Parks and recreation

Tidal branch of Woodbridge River in Woodbridge marsh, 2008,
Heards Brook, Woodbridge, NJ

In the center of Woodbridge Heards Brook passes through Heards Brook Park. Described as "the most preferred tourist attraction in Woodbridge," it has a wooded area, picnic tables, tree-lined stone pathways, basketball courts and "stunning views of the brook." [76] [77] The Rutgers floodplain plan is to integrate smaller areas of park land in the eastern portion of Heards Brook into the larger area of open spaces with a bioswale. [78]

In 2013, the Ernest L. Oros Wildlife Preserve was dedicated; the Preserve occupies 99 acres (40 ha) along the Woodbridge River and has restored the river and adjacent land as a nature preserve. Activities include hiking, boating, bird watching, and picnicking [79] Many bird species have been observed along the river, particularly at the Oros Preserve. Bird sightings include wading birds ( great blue herons and great egrets), the bald eagle, belted kingfishers and Canada goose. Eight mammal species have been noted, including raccoon and red fox; nine fish species have been identified, including the American eel. The Preserve has been called "an important hot spot in an otherwise highly developed area." [80] Within the preserve is the Butterfly Garden. [81] Downstream and north of Port Reading Avenue is Woodbridge River Park. It covers 40 acres (16 ha), and has been described as "loaded with channels, backwaters, oxbows and suitable for canoes." [82]

The Middlesex Greenway is a 3.5-mile (5.6 km) long rail trail, a former Lehigh Valley Railroad rail line between Metuchen and Woodbridge. It makes up a portion of the East Coast Greenway.

Merrill Park is a 179 acres (72 ha) park along the banks of the South Branch Rahway River, fully renovated in 2013. It has sports facilities, playgrounds, bike paths and walkways. [83]

James Parker founded the first printing press in New Jersey in 1751; his building has been restored with an old working printing press. It is located in Parker Press Park, Woodbridge Proper; the park has concert series in the summer. [84]

Woodbridge Community Center has a gym, miniature golf course, batting cages, a pool, community rooms, a playground, and also has "The Arenas", which have a roller skating rink with arcade and an ice skating rink. [85] [86]

Joseph Medwick Park is a Middlesex County Park, shared with Carteret, along banks of the Rahway River. [87] It is part of the Rahway River Greenway Plan. [88]

Government

Local government

Woodbridge is governed within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter law, under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) system of municipal government. The township is one of 71 of 565 municipalities statewide that use this form of government. [89] The governing body is comprised of a directly elected mayor and a nine-member Township Council, with all officials elected to staggered four-year terms of office on a partisan basis as part of the November general election in odd-numbered years. The council consists of four members elected at-large and five members elected from each of the township's five wards. The at-large and mayoral seats come up together for vote followed two years later by the five ward seats. [6] The Township Council is the legislative body of Woodbridge Township.

As of 2020, the Mayor of Woodbridge Township is Democrat John McCormac, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. [2] McCormac was first elected on November 7, 2006, and sworn in on November 14, 2006. [90] McCormac replaced Frank G. Pelzman, who became mayor on January 17, 2002, when former mayor James E. McGreevey resigned to become governor. [91] Members of the Township Council are Council President Lizbeth DeJesus (D, 2019; at-large), Council Vice President Brian F. Small (D, 2023; at-large), Kyle M. Anderson (D, 2023; at-large), Howie Bauer (D, 2021; Second Ward), Nancy Drumm (D, 2021; First Ward), Gregg M. Ficarra (D, 2023; at-large), Virbhadra N. "Viru" Patel (D, 2021; Fourth Ward) and Cory S. Spillar (D, 2021; Third Ward). [92] [93] [94] [95] [96]

In August 2015, the Township Council selected Cory Spillar from a list of three candidates nominated by the Democratic municipal committee to fill the Third Ward seat that had been held by Council President Michele Charmello until her resignation the previous month to take a position in Pittsburgh. The council chose new leadership, promoting Nancy Drumm from vice president to president (to replace Charmello) and Rick Dalina as vice president. [97]

Federal, state and county representation

Woodbridge Township is located in the 6th Congressional District [98] and is part of New Jersey's 19th state legislative district. [9] [99] [100] Prior to the 2010 Census, Woodbridge Township had been split between the 7th Congressional District and the 13th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections. [101]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone ( D, Long Branch). [102] [103] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker ( Newark, term ends 2021) [104] and Bob Menendez ( Paramus, term ends 2025). [105] [106]

For the 2018–2019 session ( Senate, General Assembly), the 19th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joe Vitale ( D, Woodbridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Craig Coughlin (D, Woodbridge Township) and Yvonne Lopez (D, Perth Amboy). [107] [108]

Middlesex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large on a partisan basis to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in January, the board selects from among its members a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director. As of 2015, Middlesex County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Ronald G. Rios (D, term ends December 31, 2015, Carteret; Ex-officio on all committees), [109] Freeholder Deputy Director Carol Barrett Bellante (D, 2017; Monmouth Junction, South Brunswick Township; County Administration), [110] Kenneth Armwood (D, 2016, Piscataway; Business Development and Education), [111] Charles Kenny ( D, 2016, Woodbridge Township; Finance), [112] H. James Polos (D, 2015, Highland Park; Public Safety and Health), [113] Charles E. Tomaro (D, 2017, Edison; Infrastructure Management) [114] and Blanquita B. Valenti (D, 2016, New Brunswick; Community Services). [115] [116] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Elaine M. Flynn (D, Old Bridge Township), [117] Sheriff Mildred S. Scott (D, 2016, Piscataway) [118] and Surrogate Kevin J. Hoagland (D, 2017; New Brunswick). [116] [119]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 54,674 registered voters in Woodbridge Township, of which 20,900 (38.2%) were registered as Democrats, 6,135 (11.2%) were registered as Republicans and 27,611 (50.5%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 28 voters registered to other parties. [120]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 62.2% of the vote (22,386 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 36.7% (13,200 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (386 votes), among the 36,301 ballots cast by the township's 55,262 registered voters (329 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 65.7%. [121] [122] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 55.9% of the vote (21,590 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 42.0% (16,251 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (472 votes), among the 38,657 ballots cast by the township's 55,075 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.2%. [123] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 53.5% of the vote (19,662 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 45.1% (16,589 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (367 votes), among the 36,770 ballots cast by the township's 51,913 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 70.8. [124]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 58.9% of the vote (12,122 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 39.7% (8,183 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (286 votes), among the 21,064 ballots cast by the township's 56,121 registered voters (473 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 37.5%. [125] [126] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 50.1% of the vote (11,987 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 41.9% (10,029 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.2% (1,710 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (261 votes), among the 23,913 ballots cast by the township's 53,843 registered voters, yielding a 44.4% turnout. [127]

Education

The Woodbridge Township School District serves students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. All schools in the district are accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools. The district's three high schools offer more than 150 courses, including Advanced Placement, college preparatory, business, vocational and cooperative work/study programs.

As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of 26 schools, had an enrollment of 13,888 students and 1,122.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.4:1. [128] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics [129]) are Mawbey Street School #1 [130] (365; K-5 - built 1962), Avenel Street School #4&5 [131] (398; K-5 - built 1912), Port Reading School #9 [132] (392; K-5 - built 1962), Ross Street School #11 [133] (383; K-5 - built 1920), Ford Avenue School #14 [134] (247; K-5 - built 1924), Indiana Avenue School #18 [135] (514; K-5 - built 1955), Menlo Park Terrace #19 [136] (349; K-5 - built 1958), Claremont Avenue School #20 [137] (305; K-5 - built 1958), Oak Ridge Heights School #21 [138] (289; K-5 - built 1959), Lynn Crest School #22 [139] (336; K-5 - built 1959), Woodbine Avenue School #23 [140] (506; K-5 - built 1960), Kennedy Park School #24 [141] (317; PreK-5 - built 1960), Lafayette Estates School #25 [142] (483; K-5 - built 1960), Robert Mascenik School #26 [143] (312; K-5 - built 1960), Pennsylvania Avenue School #27 [144] (339; K-5 - built 1964), Matthew Jago School #28 [145] (406; K-5 - built 1969), Oak Tree Road School #29 [146] (524; K-5 - opened 2018 [147]) Avenel Middle School [148] (590; 6-8), Colonia Middle School [149] (619; 6-8), Fords Middle School [150] (653; 6-8), Iselin Middle School [151] (748; 6-8), Woodbridge Middle School [152] (516; 6-8), Colonia High School [153] (1,325; 9-12), John F. Kennedy Memorial High School [154] (1,324; 9-12), Reaching Individual Student Excellence (RISE) [155] (30; 9-12) and Woodbridge High School [156] (1,473; 9-12). [157] [158] [159] [160]

Transportation

Roads and highways

View south along the New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) at the interchange with the Garden State Parkway and US 9 in Woodbridge

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 303.32 miles (488.15 km) of roadways, of which 244.16 miles (392.94 km) were maintained by the municipality, 28.79 miles (46.33 km) by Middlesex County, 17.69 miles (28.47 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 12.68 miles (20.41 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority. [161]

The Garden State Parkway extends 7 12 miles (12.1 km) through the Township, including exits 127 to 131. The Parkway connects Sayreville in the south to Clark in the north. [162] In addition, the New Jersey Turnpike ( Interstate 95) passes through Woodbridge Township for about 5 14 miles (8.4 km), and is accessible at Exit 11 (which features a 24-lane toll gate). [163] The Turnpike's Grover Cleveland service area is located between Interchanges 11 and 12 northbound at milepost 92.9 and the Thomas Edison service area is located between Interchanges 11 and 12 southbound at milepost 92.9. [164]

U.S. Route 1 and U.S. Route 9 serve the township and merge heading north of the township as the U.S. Route 1/9 concurrency. Other roadways passing through the township are Route 27, Route 35, Route 184, and Route 440.

The 15-lane Driscoll Bridge on the Garden State Parkway and the adjacent 6-lane Edison Bridge on U.S. Route 9 both span the Raritan River, connecting Woodbridge Township on the north with Sayreville on the south.

The first cloverleaf interchange in the United States opened in 1929 at the intersection of Route 25 (now U.S. Route 1/9) and Route 4 (now Route 35). [165]

Public transportation

There are three train stations in the township: Metropark, [166] Avenel [167] and Woodbridge. [168] Service is provided at Metropark by NJ Transit's Northeast Corridor Line [169] and at Avenel and Woodbridge on the North Jersey Coast Line. [170] The Metropark station also offers Amtrak Northeast Corridor services to Newark (Penn Station), New York (Penn Station), Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Boston. [171] In September 2019, NJ Transit initiated increased daily service at the Avenel station and announced the resumption of weekend service after more than 20 years. [172]

NJ Transit provides bus service on the 115 and 116 routes to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, on the 48 to Elizabeth and local service on the 801, 802, 803, 804, 805, 810, 813 and 815. [173]

Woodbridge Floodplain

Flood hazard zones, Woodbridge Township, New Jersey
Woodbridge, New Jersey, area inundated by Woodbridge River (center of illustration) after Hurricane Sandy (Source: USGS Sandy Storm Tide Mapper)

Woodbridge's geographical features make it prone to repeated flooding. It is surrounded by water on three sides, the Arthur Kill, a tidal strait to the east, and tidal rivers to the south, Raritan River, and north, Rahway River; and, much of the developed land in Woodbridge has low elevations, as little as five feet above sea level. About 19% of Woodbridge Township lies within FEMA's flood hazard areas. [174] There is a long history of tidal flooding along the Woodbridge River in Woodbridge Proper, the Raritan in Keasbey and the Arthur Kill in Sewaren and Port Reading. [175] In addition to tidal flooding, fluvial flooding is common. Woodbridge streams and rivers have been described as having a "high flow, flashy nature." The land is relatively impervious, and flooding is exacerbated by steep slopes and urban cover. Flooding in the South Branch Rahway River and Pumpkin Patch Brook hazard zones is predominantly fluvial. Prolonged coastal storms ( nor'easters), which combine tidal and fluvial flooding, along with flow constrictions, cause an increase in the duration of flooding of the Woodbridge River and its tributaries, Heards Brook and Wedgewood Brook, which may last for days before water levels subside. [174] Frequency of flooding has increased over time. Sea levels are rising and residential areas have moved into previous marsh land, decreasing the ability of the land to absorb excess water. A 1770 map shows that all land surrounding the Woodbridge River was salt marshes. In October 2012, New Jersey was devastated by Hurricane Sandy [176] and Woodbridge suffered significant flood damage. One of the most affected neighborhoods from Hurricane Sandy was Watson-Cramptom, an area adjacent to the Woodbridge River; prior to 2009 this area was zoned for high density residential housing, including an area of wetlands and meadows. [177] When the Sandy came to this area, it was "characterized as a tsunami-like water wall," destroying adjoining homes. [178] After Sandy, using money from the New Jersey Buyout Program, [179] Woodbridge began buying out and demolishing many residential properties in the flood hazard areas. [180] [181] The plan is to restore the Woodbridge flood zones to their original riparian environment. [182] Woodbridge's actions and plans have been called a "slow motion evacuation from climate change." As people move out of flood hazard areas, they will be replaced by a " floodplain forest of native trees, shrubs and grass," to help absorb water from rising sea levels. [183] In Woodbridge not everybody wants to sell; 2050, when the properties have a high probability of severe damage from rising sea levels, [184] seems too far in the future for some. [183] These holdouts interfere with the goal of land buffers of entire blocks, between rivers and homes. [185]

Points of interest

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Woodbridge Township include:

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b Mayor John E. McCormac, Woodbridge Township. Accessed February 18, 2020.
  3. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  4. ^ Administration & Finance, Woodbridge Township. Accessed March 9, 2020.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Woodbridge Township. Accessed March 9, 2020.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 87.
  7. ^ a b c "Township of Woodbridge (Middlesex County, New Jersey)". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved May 15, 2014.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Englewood Cliffs borough, Bergen County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 1, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Englewood Cliffs borough Archived 2011-12-22 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 1, 2012.
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