Saukville, Wisconsin

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Saukville, Wisconsin
Location of Saukville in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin.
Location of Saukville in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin.
Coordinates: 43°24′22″N 87°57′47″W / 43.40611°N 87.96306°W / 43.40611; -87.96306
Latitude and Longitude:

43°24′22″N 87°57′47″W / 43.40611°N 87.96306°W / 43.40611; -87.96306
Country  United States
State  Wisconsin
County Ozaukee
Incorporated1915; 105 years ago (1915)
Area
 • Total3.57 sq mi (9.25 km2)
 • Land3.52 sq mi (9.12 km2)
 • Water0.05 sq mi (0.13 km2)
Elevation889 ft (271 m)
Population
 ( 2010) [3]
 • Total4,451
 • Estimate 
(2018) [4]
4,430
 • Density1,258.17/sq mi (485.81/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 ( Central (CST))
 • Summer ( DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code(s) 262
FIPS code55-71725 [5]
GNIS feature ID1584104 [2]
Website village.saukville.wi.us

Saukville is a village in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 4,451 at the 2010 census. Most of the village perimeter is bordered by the Town of Saukville to the north and west, the Town of Port Washington to the east and southeast and by the Town of Grafton to the south and southwest.

Geography

Saukville is located at 43°22′52″N 87°56′40″W / 43.38111°N 87.94444°W / 43.38111; -87.94444 (43.38137, −87.944578). [6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 3.85 square miles (9.97 km2), of which, 3.80 square miles (9.84 km2) of it is land and 0.05 square miles (0.13 km2) is water. [7]

History

The Payne Hotel stagecoach stop, constructed in 1848

Saukville was the site of a Native American village on the Milwaukee River, that was probably inhabited by the Sauk people. [8] The Native Americans were forced to leave Wisconsin in the 1830s, and white settlers arrived in the area around 1845 and began to build along Green Bay Road.

Saukville was part of the town of Port Washington until 1848 when the town of Saukville was established. In that year, William Payne opened a stagecoach inn for travelers on the route from Milwaukee to Green Bay. The Payne Hotel still stands today and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [9] In 1848, several residents constructed a dam on the Milwaukee River and later built a saw mill and a grist mill. Throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, Saukville was a rural community with many dairy farmers. [10]

In 1871, a rail line was constructed in the community. It would eventually became part of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway.

In 1915, the village of Saukville officially incorporated with a vote of 66 in favor and 40 opposed. At that time, the village had a population of 376 people. [11]

In 1945, sixty German prisoners of war from Camp Fredonia in Little Kohler, Wisconsin were contracted to work at Canned Goods, Inc. in the village to make up for the loss of labor due to local men fighting in World War II. [12]

Saukville experienced significant population growth following World War II. Between 1950 and 1980, the village population increased five-times over, from 699 to 3,494. The construction of Interstate 43 in the mid-1960s connected Saukville to other communities, such as Milwaukee and Sheboygan. [11]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920330
193039920.9%
19404318.0%
195069962.2%
19601,03848.5%
19701,38933.8%
19803,494151.5%
19903,6955.8%
20004,06810.1%
20104,4519.4%
Est. 20184,430 [4]−0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [13]

2010 census

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 4,451 people, 1,766 households, and 1,208 families living in the village. The population density was 1,171.3 inhabitants per square mile (452.2/km2). There were 1,848 housing units at an average density of 486.3 per square mile (187.8/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 96.0% White, 0.7% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.9% of the population.

There were 1,766 households of which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.6% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.6% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.06.

The median age in the village was 36.7 years. 26.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 29.4% were from 25 to 44; 28.1% were from 45 to 64; and 8.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.2% male and 49.8% female.

2000 census

As of the census [5] of 2000, there were 4,068 people, 1,583 households, and 1,104 families living in the village. The population density was 1,366.3 people per square mile (527.1/km²). There were 1,639 housing units at an average density of 550.5 per square mile (212.4/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 97.42% White, 0.57% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.32% from other races, and 0.93% from two or more races. 2.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,583 households out of which 38.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.2% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the village, the population was spread out with 27.5% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 34.8% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 7.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.5 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $53,159, and the median income for a family was $62,436. Males had a median income of $41,625 versus $28,583 for females. The per capita income for the village was $22,035. About 1.4% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.4% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "2018 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Feb 15, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2011-02-20. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  8. ^ "Newland Became Cedarburg". The Milwaukee Sentinel. 4 September 1967. pp. Part 5, Page 5. Retrieved 23 April 2015.
  9. ^ "Early history of Ozaukee County, Wisconsin". University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  10. ^ "Encyclopedia of Milwaukee: Saukville". University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  11. ^ a b "Encyclopedia of Milwaukee: Saukville"
  12. ^ Cowley, Betty (2002-01-01). Stalag Wisconsin: Inside WW II Prisoner-of-war Camps. Badger Books Inc. pp. 120–25. ISBN  9781878569837.
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

External links