Thiensville, Wisconsin

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Thiensville
Location of Thiensville in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin.
Location of Thiensville in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin.
Thiensville is located in Wisconsin
Thiensville
Thiensville
Location within Wisconsin
Coordinates: 43°14′13″N 87°58′48″W / 43.23694°N 87.98000°W / 43.23694; -87.98000
Latitude and Longitude:

43°14′13″N 87°58′48″W / 43.23694°N 87.98000°W / 43.23694; -87.98000
Country  United States
State  Wisconsin
County Ozaukee
Incorporated1910; 110 years ago (1910)
Area
 • Total1.08 sq mi (2.79 km2)
 • Land1.04 sq mi (2.69 km2)
 • Water0.04 sq mi (0.10 km2)
Elevation676 ft (206 m)
Population
 ( 2010) [3]
 • Total3,235
 • Estimate 
(2018) [4]
3,147
 • Density3,031.79/sq mi (1,170.85/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 ( Central (CST))
 • Summer ( DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code(s) 262
FIPS code55-79475 [5]
GNIS feature ID1575351 [2]
Website village.thiensville.wi.us

Thiensville is a village in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 3,235 at the 2010 census. It was founded by its namesake, John Henry Thien.

In July 2005, CNNMoney.com ranked Thiensville and neighboring Mequon 19th on its list of the 100 Best Places to Live in the United States. [6]

Geography

Thiensville is located at 43°14′13″N 87°58′48″W / 43.23694°N 87.98000°W / 43.23694; -87.98000 (43.236806, -87.979951). [7] The village is located the north and west sides of a bend in the Milwaukee River. Pigeon Creek flows through downtown Thiensville into the river.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.10 square miles (2.85 km2), of which, 1.09 square miles (2.82 km2) of it is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water. [8]

The village of Thiensville is completely surrounded by the larger city of Mequon and is often referred to by locals as Mequon's 'donut hole'

History

In early 19th century, the Potawatomi lived on the west bank of the Milwaukee River and had a village in present-day Thiensville, located on Pigeon Creek, north of Freistadt Road. They surrendered their land to the United States federal government in 1833 through the Treaty of Chicago, which required them to leave the area by 1838. [9]

The first permanent white settlers arrived in the mid-1830s from New York, England, and Ireland. One of the first settlers was John Weston, who settled near present-day Thiensville in 1837 and served as the first postmaster of the Town of Mequon. The first Germans arrived in 1839, and in the 1840s Germans became the largest ethnic group in Thiensville, the Town of Mequon, and Ozaukee County. [10]

Joachim Heinrich Thien moved to the area in 1842 from Oldenburg, Prussia, and helped design a plan for the settlement that would become Thiensville. A year later he employed a group of Native American laborers to construct a dam and a canal on the Milwaukee River. He then built a sawmill and a store. Thien hosted the first town meeting for the Town of Mequon in 1846, [11] and in 1857 he established the volunteer fire department and served as its first captain.

Thien was a freethinker, as were many of the early German settlers. The influence of the freethinker societies kept formal churches out of the village until 1919, when St. Cecilia Catholic Church was built. [12]

Thiensville grew in part because of its location on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, which was constructed in the early 1870s. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Thiensville was one of the most concentrated communities in the Town of Mequon. While most of Mequon was quite rural, Theinsville functioned as a downtown area with stores, mills, and professional services. The Village of Theinsville incorporated in 1910 with a population of 289. [13] [14]

In 1945, eighty German prisoners of war from Camp Fredonia in Little Kohler, Wisconsin were contracted to work at the Herbert A. Nieman Canning Company in the village to make up for the loss of labor due to local men fighting in World War II. [15] German prisoners from Camp Rockfield in Rockfield, Wisconsin, (located in present-day Germantown) also worked at the Fromm Bros., Nieman & Co. Fox Ranch in northern Mequon. [16]

In the 20th Century, Mequon and the Village of Theinsville developed a close relationship, [17] with shared schools, [18] animal clinics, [19] fire departments, libraries, [20] and governmental offices.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920334
193050049.7%
19405000.0%
195089779.4%
19602,507179.5%
19703,18226.9%
19803,3415.0%
19903,301−1.2%
20003,254−1.4%
20103,235−0.6%
Est. 20183,147 [4]−2.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [21]

2010 census

As of the census [3] of 2010, there were 3,235 people, 1,532 households, and 865 families living in the village. The population density was 2,967.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,145.9/km2). There were 1,644 housing units at an average density of 1,508.3 per square mile (582.4/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 93.3% White, 1.7% African American, 0.4% Native American, 2.1% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.8% of the population.

There were 1,532 households of which 24.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.6% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 43.5% were non-families. 38.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.82.

The median age in the village was 46.3 years. 20.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.5% were from 25 to 44; 31% were from 45 to 64; and 21% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 45.8% male and 54.2% female.

2000 census

As of the census [5] of 2000, there were 3,254 people, 1,503 households, and 933 families living in the village. The population density was 2,964.7 people per square mile (1,142.2/km²). There were 1,570 housing units at an average density of 1,430.4 per square mile (551.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 96.56% White, 0.74% African American, 0.06% Native American, 1.26% Asian, 0.18% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.04% of the population.

There were 1,503 households out of which 25.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.9% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 2.77.

In the village, the population was spread out with 20.7% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 86.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.2 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $55,962, and the median income for a family was $69,286. Males had a median income of $46,088 versus $29,500 for females. The per capita income for the village was $30,748. About 1.9% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Thiensville is governed by a board of seven trustees and a village president.

Village presidents of Thiensville: [22]

From To Village President
1910 1912 John F. Gierach
1912 1917 John E. Mueller
1917 1920 Charles A. Maas
1920 1922 Charles Friedrich
1922 1927 Charles A. Maas
1927 1935 Julius W. Schaefer
1935 1945 Dr. Alfred H. Carthaus
1945 1955 Theodore O. Liebscher
1955 1959 Harold H. Roethel
1959 1961 Edward Langley
1961 1967 Theodore O. Liebscher
1967 1968 William T. Flynn
1968 1971 Richard R. Sitman
1971 1977 Ned A. Kellner
1977 1987 Robert C. Warber
1987 1987 William C. Roselle
1987 1989 Donald A. Molyneux
1989 1991 John V. Kitzke
1991 1995 Roy Wetzel
1995 2006 Donald A. Molyneux
2006 2012 Karl V. Hertz
2012 present Van Mobley

Education

Thiensville is served by the Mequon-Thiensville School District.

Attractions

Thiensville Park, along the Milwaukee river, hosts the "Family Fun Before the Fourth" annually on the Saturday before July 4. The park also hosts the town's annual Lion's Fest every June.

From June to October, The Thiensville Farmers Market is held by the Milwaukee River in the scenic Village Park (299 Elm St.) every Tuesday (8am - 7pm), where fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers from area growers are sold.

Main Street, which runs the length of the village, is the site of the Thiensville business district, consisting of many historic buildings which have been converted into small shops and businesses. [23]

In November and December, Main Street has a light display for the holiday season.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ "2018 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Feb 15, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ "Village of Thiensville, WI". Kids Out and About Milwaukee. Retrieved 2018-11-06.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  9. ^ "Early history of Ozaukee County, Wisconsin". University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  10. ^ "Early history of Ozaukee County, Wisconsin". University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  11. ^ Walter D. Corrigan, History of the Town of Mequon, Ozaukee County, Wisconsin, Brought Down to about 1870. Mequon: Mequon Club, 1950.
  12. ^ "Encyclopedia of Milwaukee: Village of Thiensville". University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Retrieved 2020-01-03.
  13. ^ [1] Archived July 26, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  14. ^ "Ozaukee County, Wisconsin - History - Thiensville Village Hall & Fire Department". Co.ozaukee.wi.us. Archived from the original on 2012-09-26. Retrieved 2013-01-17.
  15. ^ Cowley, Betty (2002-01-01). Stalag Wisconsin: Inside WW II Prisoner-of-war Camps. Badger Books Inc. pp. 120–25. ISBN  9781878569837.
  16. ^ Cowley, Betty (2002-01-01). Stalag Wisconsin: Inside WW II Prisoner-of-war Camps. Badger Books Inc. pp. 227–31. ISBN  9781878569837.
  17. ^ "City of Mequon and Village of Thiensville Community Gateway Features | Mequon Wisconsin". www.ci.mequon.wi.us. Retrieved 2019-11-09.
  18. ^ "Mequon-Thiensville School District | The Launchpad to Success". www.mtsd.k12.wi.us. Retrieved 2019-11-09.
  19. ^ "Homepage | Thiensville-Mequon Small Animal Clinic". www.thiensvillemequonsac.com. Retrieved 2019-11-09.
  20. ^ "Frank L. Weyenberg Library of Mequon-Thiensville | Official Website". www.flwlib.org. Retrieved 2019-11-09.
  21. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  22. ^ History of Thiensville Book Committee, (2010), "Village of Thiensville Centennial celebrates 100 years, 1910-2010", Thiensville, Wisconsin.
  23. ^ "Ozaukee County Wisconsin - Tourism - Village of Thiensville". Ozaukeetourism.com. Archived from the original on 2012-08-07. Retrieved 2013-01-17.
  24. ^ Film Exchange Lofts-History

External links