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Fuchū
府中市
Approach to the Ōkunitama Shrine, Fūchu
Approach to the Ōkunitama Shrine, Fūchu
Flag of Fuchū
Official seal of Fuchū
Location of Fuchū in Tokyo Metropolis
Location of Fuchū in Tokyo Metropolis
Fuchū is located in Japan
Fuchū
Fuchū
 
Coordinates: 35°40′8.2″N 139°28′39.5″E / 35.668944°N 139.477639°E / 35.668944; 139.477639
Fuchū,_Tokyo Latitude and Longitude:

35°40′8.2″N 139°28′39.5″E / 35.668944°N 139.477639°E / 35.668944; 139.477639
Country Japan
Region Kantō
Prefecture Tokyo
First official recorded111 AD
Town settledApril 1, 1893
City settledApril 1, 1954
Government
 • Mayor Norio Takano [ ja] (from February 2012)
Area
 • Total29.43 km2 (11.36 sq mi)
Population
 (April 2021)
 • Total260,508
 • Density8,900/km2 (23,000/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+9 ( Japan Standard Time)
Phone number042-364-4111
Address24-24 Nishi-machi, Fuchū-shi, Tokyo 183-8703
Climate Cfa
Website Official website
Symbols
Bird Skylark
Flower Ume
Tree Keyaki
Fuchū City Hall

Fuchū (府中市, Fuchū-shi) is a city located in western Tokyo Metropolis, Japan. Fuchū serves as a regional commercial center and a commuter town for workers in central Tokyo. The city hosts large scale manufacturing facilities for Toshiba, NEC and Suntory, as well as the Bank of Japan's main computer operations center. Local sporting attractions include the Tokyo Racecourse and the training grounds of Top League rugby teams Toshiba Brave Lupus and Suntory Sungoliath.

As of 1 April 2021, the city had an estimated population of 260,508, and a population density of 8,900 persons per square kilometer. [1] The total area of the city is 29.43 square kilometres (11.36 sq mi).

Geography

Fuchū is located approximately 20 km west of the centre of Tokyo. Using the Keiō Line from Shinjuku, it is 25 minutes to Fuchū Station (main station). It spreads across the Musashino Terrace on the left bank of the Tama River, facing the Tama hills on the opposite shore. The Tama River flows through the southernmost end of the city from west to east. The Kokubunji cliff runs west to east along the north; the Fuchū cliff runs west to east through the center of the city. The former has a height of 10 to 15 m, and the latter, 10 to 20 m. Sengenyama with an altitude of 79 m is in the northeast part, and the height from the foot is about 30 m. The region is mostly flatland. To the south of the Fuchū cliff is the Tama River lowlands while to the north of the Kokubunji cliff is the Richa-spencu side of Richa-spencu Plateau; the region between is the Tachikawa side of the Richa-spencu Plateau. The cliffs are called hake in the local dialect. The Nogaysa river, a tributary of the Tama River, grazes the northeast end of the city.

Surrounding municipalities

Tokyo Metropolis

Climate

Fuchū has a Humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) characterized by warm summers and cool winters with light to no snowfall. The average annual temperature in Fuchū is 14.0 °C. The average annual rainfall is 1647 mm with September as the wettest month. The temperatures are highest on average in August, at around 25.5 °C, and lowest in January, at around 2.6 °C. [2]

Climate data for Fuchū, Tokyo (1991−2020 normals, extremes 1976−present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 19.4
(66.9)
24.1
(75.4)
28.1
(82.6)
32.0
(89.6)
33.5
(92.3)
36.7
(98.1)
38.8
(101.8)
38.9
(102.0)
38.5
(101.3)
32.2
(90.0)
26.1
(79.0)
25.3
(77.5)
38.9
(102.0)
Average high °C (°F) 9.9
(49.8)
10.8
(51.4)
14.0
(57.2)
19.2
(66.6)
23.7
(74.7)
26.3
(79.3)
30.3
(86.5)
31.6
(88.9)
27.6
(81.7)
22.1
(71.8)
16.9
(62.4)
12.2
(54.0)
20.4
(68.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) 4.5
(40.1)
5.4
(41.7)
8.8
(47.8)
13.9
(57.0)
18.5
(65.3)
21.8
(71.2)
25.7
(78.3)
26.8
(80.2)
23.1
(73.6)
17.5
(63.5)
11.8
(53.2)
6.8
(44.2)
15.4
(59.7)
Average low °C (°F) −0.7
(30.7)
0.3
(32.5)
3.7
(38.7)
8.7
(47.7)
13.8
(56.8)
18.1
(64.6)
22.2
(72.0)
23.2
(73.8)
19.5
(67.1)
13.5
(56.3)
7.1
(44.8)
1.6
(34.9)
10.9
(51.6)
Record low °C (°F) −8.4
(16.9)
−8.2
(17.2)
−6.5
(20.3)
−1.6
(29.1)
4.0
(39.2)
10.5
(50.9)
13.5
(56.3)
15.7
(60.3)
8.6
(47.5)
2.3
(36.1)
−2.8
(27.0)
−7.2
(19.0)
−8.4
(16.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 56.9
(2.24)
52.4
(2.06)
113.8
(4.48)
121.9
(4.80)
133.1
(5.24)
166.6
(6.56)
164.2
(6.46)
173.4
(6.83)
246.7
(9.71)
228.0
(8.98)
83.2
(3.28)
58.7
(2.31)
1,598.9
(62.95)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 4.9 5.2 9.1 9.2 10.6 12.5 11.9 9.7 11.8 10.4 7.1 5.1 107.5
Mean monthly sunshine hours 201.3 178.2 179.1 180.3 179.6 123.6 148.1 178.0 130.2 138.0 158.2 182.0 1,986.2
Source: JMA [3] [4]

Demographics

Per Japanese census data, [5] the population of Fuchū increased rapidly in the 1950s and 1960s.

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1950 45,342—    
1960 82,098+81.1%
1970 163,173+98.8%
1980 192,198+17.8%
1990 209,396+8.9%
2000 226,769+8.3%
2010 255,453+12.6%

History

The government of ancient Musashi Province was established in Fuchū by the Taika Reform, and the city prospered as the local center of politics, economy, and culture. It prospered as a post town on the Kōshū Kaidō highway in the Edo period, and the Kita Tama District public office was placed here after the start of the Meiji era.

  • 645: With the Taika Reforms of the government of Musashi Province was established in Fuchū.
  • 1333: The Battle of Bubaigawara was fought.
  • 1602: The Fuchū post-town was established with the upgrading of the Kōshū-dochu road ( Kōshū Highway).
  • 1868: Nirayama Prefecture was established, and the southwest part of the city region becomes part of it. The remainder was under the jurisdiction of the Musashi prefectural governor.
  • 1869: Shinagawa Prefecture was established, and except for the southwest part, the city becomes part of the prefecture.
  • 1871: Establishment of the prefectural system. Parts of the city were transferred to Kanagawa Prefecture by the next year step by step.
  • 1878: Tama District of Kanagawa Prefecture was divided into three districts: North Tama, South Tama, West Tama, and one district in Tokyo Prefecture: East Tama. The city region became part of North Tama District, whose district offices were established in the city.
  • 1880: Four towns and one village of the central area of the city region merged into Fuchū-eki.
  • 1889: Eight villages of the eastern area of city region merged into Tama Village, and three villages of the western area merged into Nishifu Village. Fuchū-eki reorganized as a town, without changing its name.
  • 1893: Three Tama districts were admitted to Tokyo Prefecture. Fuchū-eki changed its name to Fuchū Town.
  • 1910: The Tokyo Gravel Railroad (later JNR Shimogawara Line) is opened for traffic.
  • 1913: Telephone service commenced.
  • 1916: Keiō Electric Tram (part of present Keiō Line) opened for traffic.
  • 1922: Tama Railroad (present Seibu Tamagawa Line) is opened for traffic.
  • 1925: Gyokunan Electric Railroad (part of the present Keiō Line) opened for traffic.
  • 1929: Nanbu Railroad (present JR East Nambu Line) opened for traffic.
  • 1943: Tokyo Prefecture merged with Tokyo City, forming Tokyo-to.
  • 1954 April 1: Fuchū Town, Tama Village, Nishifu Village merged into Fuchū City, with the structure of a city.
  • 1956: New Kōshū Highway is opened for traffic between Higashi Fuchū and Honshūku.
  • 1961: New Kōshū Highway is opened for traffic between Higashi Fuchū and Chōfu.
  • 1968: The 300 million yen robbery occurred in Harumicho. This was the biggest robbery in the history of the nation.
  • 1973: The Musashino Line opened for traffic. The Shimogawara Line closed.

Government

Fuchū has a mayor-council form of government with a directly elected mayor and a unicameral city council of 30 members. Fuchū contributes two members to the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly. In terms of national politics, the city is part of Tokyo 18th district of the lower house of the Diet of Japan.

Education

Colleges and universities

Primary and secondary education

Fuchū has five public high schools are operated by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Board of Education,

Tokyo Metropolis also operates three special education schools for the handicapped.

The city has 22 public elementary schools and 11 public junior high schools operated by the city government.

Public junior high schools: [6]

Public elementary schools: [6]

There is one municipal kindergarten: Midori Kindergarten (みどり幼稚園). [6]

There is also one private combined middle/high school and two private elementary schools.

Transportation

Railway

KeioRailway logo.svg Keio Corporation - Keiō Line

KeioRailway logo.svg Keio Corporation - Keiō Keibajō Line

JR logo (east).svg JR EastNambu Line

JR logo (east).svg JR EastMusashino Line

SeibuRailway mark.svg Seibu Railway - Seibu Tamagawa Line

Bus routes

Most bus routes in the city start at Fuchū Station. Other routes start at Tama-Reien Station, Higashi-Fuchū Station, Bubaigawara Station, Nakagawara Station, Tama Station, Koremasa Station, or Seisekisakuragaoka Station.

Highways

Toll roads

  • E19 Chūō Expressway
    • Inagi Interchange (3.1; limited interchange)
    • Kunitachi Fuchū Interchange (4)
    • Fuchu Smart On/offrmap (under construction)
      Chōfu Interchange (3) is not located in Fuchū city area, but serves the eastern half of city.

National highways

  • National Route 20 (Kōshū Highway); Chūō Expressway and Route 20 are parallel to Keiō Line Railway, and run east to west, connecting Fuchū and central Tokyo.

Prefectural roads

  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 9 Kawasaki Fuchu line Fuchū highway (also called the Kawasaki highway), Koremasa Bridge
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 14 Shinjuku Kunitachi line Tohachi Road
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 15 Fuchu; Kiyose line Koganei Highway
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 17 Tokorozawa Fuchu line Fuchū Highway
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 18 Fuchu Machida line Kamakura Highway, Sekido Bridge
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 20 Fuchu Sagamihara Line Fuchū Yotsuya Bridge (Yaen Highway)
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 110 Fuchu Mitaka line Hitomi Highway, Shin-Koganei Highway
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 133 Ogawa Fuchu line Kokubunji Highway
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 229 Fuchu Chōfu line Old Kōshū Highway
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 245 Tachikawa Kokubunji Line Takikubo Dori
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 247 Fuchu Koganei line (the section in Fuchū is unopened for traffic)
  • Tokyo Prefectural Route 248 Fuchu Kodaira line Shin-Koganei Highway

Local attractions

Baba Daimon Keyaki avenue
One of the giant drums for the Kurayami festival held at Okunitam Shrine every spring

Sports

Notable people

Sister city relations

References

  1. ^ "Fuchū city official statistics" (in Japanese). Japan.
  2. ^ Fuchū climate data
  3. ^ 観測史上1~10位の値(年間を通じての値). JMA. Retrieved February 23, 2022.
  4. ^ 気象庁 / 平年値(年・月ごとの値). JMA. Retrieved February 23, 2022.
  5. ^ Fuchū population statistics
  6. ^ a b c "市立小・中学校、市立幼稚園の一覧". Fuchu City. Retrieved 2022-12-04.
  7. ^ [1] Archived October 28, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ "厄除け・厄払いは大國魂神社(東京・府中)". Ookunitamajinja.or.jp. Retrieved 2012-01-06.
  9. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 74-5
  10. ^ " Creator." Naoki Urasawa's Monster.
  11. ^ "International Exchange". List of Affiliation Partners within Prefectures. Council of Local Authorities for International Relations (CLAIR). Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 21 November 2015.

External links