From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is a timeline of the history of London, the capital of England and the United Kingdom.

Prehistory

Early history to the 10th century

The 11th to 15th centuries

Bishopsgate

16th century

17th century

18th century

1700 to 1749

Bevis Marks Synagogue
The view of St Paul's Cathedral in August 2022 taken from the main road that passes it on the south side

1750 to 1799

Westminster Bridge (1750), depicted by Joseph Farrington, 1789, with Westminster Hall and Westminster Abbey beyond

19th century

20th century

21st century

See also

References

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Bibliography

See also lists of works about London by period: Tudor London, Stuart London, 18th century, 19th century, 1900–1939, 1960s

published in the 19th century
published in the 20th century
published in the 21st century

External links