Hendersonville, Mississippi

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Hendersonville
Hendersonville is located in Mississippi
Hendersonville
Hendersonville
Coordinates: 33°56′15″N 89°43′43″W / 33.93750°N 89.72861°W / 33.93750; -89.72861
Latitude and Longitude:

33°56′15″N 89°43′43″W / 33.93750°N 89.72861°W / 33.93750; -89.72861
CountryUnited States
State Mississippi
County Yalobusha
Elevation
467 ft (112 m)
Time zone UTC-6 ( Central (CST))
 • Summer ( DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
GNIS feature ID705923 [1]

Hendersonville is an extinct town located in Yalobusha County, Mississippi. [1]

Once the largest town in Yalobusha County, the former settlement is today covered by forest.

History

John Henderson, a Presbyterian missionary and the town's namesake, settled in the area in 1798. [2]

In 1833, the Mississippi Legislature authorized the formation of 17 counties, including Yalobusha. Yalobusha County's first elected officials, called the "Board of Police", met in 1834 at Hendersonville. A county seat had not yet been selected, and the Board of Police solicited land donations. At the second meeting, a nearby location more centrally located in the county, later named Coffeeville, was selected for the county seat. [2] [3] A local resident, Capt. L. Lake, wrote in 1834: "Hendersonville then went down and ultimately lost its name, being absorbed in a farm known as 'Oakchickamau,'" owned by Franklin E. Plummer.

An early resident of county named Mr. E. Percy Howe, appeared to dislike both Hendersonville and Coffeeville. He left a poem behind after moving away:

Upon a hill near Derden's Mill
There is a place called Coffeeville;
The meanest town I ever saw
Save Plummer's town, 'Oakchickamau.' [3]

References

  1. ^ a b "Hendersonville (historical)". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  2. ^ a b "Welcome to Yalobusha County!". Mississippi Genealogy & History Network.
  3. ^ a b Rowland, Dunbar (1907). Mississippi: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form. 2. Southern Historical Publishing Association. p. 466.