Vivian Beaumont Theater

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Vivian Beaumont Theater
Lincoln Center Theater
Address150 West 65th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates 40°46′25″N 73°59′03″W / 40.77361°N 73.98417°W / 40.77361; -73.98417
Latitude and Longitude:

40°46′25″N 73°59′03″W / 40.77361°N 73.98417°W / 40.77361; -73.98417
Public transit Subway 1 train at 66th Street–Lincoln Center
NYC Bus: M5, M7, M11, M20, M66, M104
OwnerLincoln Center Inc.
OperatorLincoln Center Theater
Type Broadway
Capacity1,080
Construction
OpenedOctober 21, 1965
Architect Eero Saarinen and Jo Mielziner
Website
www.lct.org

The Vivian Beaumont Theater is a Broadway theater in the Lincoln Center complex at 150 West 65th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. Operated by the nonprofit Lincoln Center Theater (LCT), the Beaumont is the only Broadway theater outside the Theater District near Times Square. Named after heiress and actress Vivian Beaumont Allen, the theater was one of the last structures designed by modernist architect Eero Saarinen. The theater shares a building with the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and contains two off-Broadway venues, the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater and the Claire Tow Theater.

The Beaumont occupies the southern and western sides of its building's first and second floors, while the library wraps above and on top of it. The main facade faces Lincoln Center's plaza and is made of glass and steel, with a travertine attic above. The main auditorium has approximately 1,080 seats across two levels, arranged in a steeply sloped semicircular layout. The Beaumont differs from traditional Broadway theaters because of its use of a flexible stage, which could be extended with a thrust stage of varying length. The layout led to complaints about inferior sightlines and acoustics in the theater's early years. The 299-seat Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater is in the basement and the 112-seat Claire Tow Theater is on the roof.

Allen donated $3 million for the theater's construction in 1958 but died before its completion. The Beaumont opened on October 21, 1965, and was originally operated by Jules Irving and Herbert Blau of the Repertory Theater of Lincoln Center, generally presenting four shows a season. The Beaumont was managed by the New York Shakespeare Festival, under the direction of Joseph Papp, from 1973 to 1977. Richmond Crinkley took over the theater for the next eight years, with the Beaumont only operating for two seasons during that time. Due to a canceled renovation and financial difficulties led to the Beaumont being reorganized in 1985, with Gregory Mosher and Bernard Gersten of the LCT taking over. The Beaumont became much more profitable and was renovated in 1996. The theater has hosted several popular productions since the late 1980s, including Anything Goes, Contact, The Light in the Piazza, South Pacific, The King and I, and My Fair Lady.

Description

The Vivian Beaumont Theater was designed by Finnish American architect Eero Saarinen, with Jo Mielziner overseeing the design of the interior. [1] [2] It is part of Lincoln Center, a performing arts complex on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City. [3] The Beaumont is in the same building as the New York Public Library (NYPL)'s Performing Arts Library, designed by Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM). [2] [4] [5] Various contractors were also involved in the Beaumont's construction, including general contractor Turner Construction, [6] acoustical engineer Bolt Beranek & Newman, [7] structural engineer Ammann & Whitney and mechanical engineer Syska Hennessy. [6] [7] [8]

The theater/library building is on the western side of Paul Milstein Pool and Terrace, the elevated plaza at the middle of Lincoln Center, just south of 65th Street. [2] [3] [9] The plaza contains a reflecting pool at its center, measuring around 80 ft (24 m) wide and 120 or 125 ft (37 or 38 m) long. [5] [10] [a] Inside the plaza, just outside the theater's entrance, is a blackened-steel sculpture by Alexander Calder entitled Le Guichet. Named after the French word for "ticket window", the sculpture measures 14 ft (4.3 m) wide by 22 ft (6.7 m) high. [10] [11] Another sculpture by Henry Moore, entitled Reclining Figure, is in the pool. [12] The structure faces the Metropolitan Opera House to the south; David Geffen Hall to the east; and the Juilliard School to the north, via a pedestrian bridge across 65th Street. [9] [10]

Form and facade

The library/theater building was the third to open at Lincoln Center. [13] Original plans conceived the library and theater as separate buildings, but the structures were combined in the final plan. [4] [14] The theater forms the building's core and occupies the southern and western sides of the building's first and second floors. [4] [15] [16] The library runs along the building's northern and eastern sides, as well as much of the third floor. The theater's stage house protrudes through the third floor, with the library running around it in a "doughnut" shape. Another entrance to the library, facing west toward Amsterdam Avenue, is below the theater. [15] [16] The attic houses the library's stacks. [15] [17]

SOM and Saarinen collaborated on the design of the exteriors. [4] The main facade, along Lincoln Center's plaza, is two stories high and made of glass and steel. [15] The facade consists of a glass curtain wall and two recessed square concrete columns, which create a peristyle flanking the curtain wall. [18] [19] Unlike the travertine surface of the plaza, the columns are finished in exposed aggregate. [18] The columns are attached to the attic via steel pins with large bronze pyramidal covers. The other wall surfaces are clad in travertine. [10] [18] [19]

The exterior of the library/theater building contains a heavy roof that protrudes over the main facade, which is covered in travertine. [10] [19] The roof was designed to screen the library and its performing-arts museum behind it. The top of the roof originally had an exposed-aggregate finish, but this was subsequently covered with stone pavement. On the underside of the roof are coffers containing recessed downlights as well as fluorescent uplights. Similar lighting fixtures are used in the theater's lobby as well as throughout the library's interior. [19] The roof is carried by two Vierendeel trusses measuring 20 ft (6.1 m) high and 153 ft (47 m) long. [8] [19] [18] [b] Part of the library, housing the Vincent Astor Gallery, [20] is placed between the trusses. [21] [16]

Interior

The Beaumont contains three theaters operated by Lincoln Center Theater (LCT): the main auditorium, which is classified as a Broadway theater, as well as two off-Broadway venues, the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater and the Claire Tow Theater. [22] The main auditorium is the only Broadway theater outside Manhattan's Theater District, [23] and productions there are eligible for Tony Awards. [24] The off-Broadway houses' productions are not eligible for Tony Awards unless they move to the Beaumont or another Broadway theater. [25]

The Beaumont has two main access points. Vehicular traffic enters through a ramp beneath the theater, where patrons take elevators to the orchestra. Pedestrians enter through the main plaza facing David Geffen Hall and the Metropolitan Opera House. [10] [26] The plaza-level lobby is midway between the orchestra and balcony levels of the primary auditorium. [10] [16] [19] The plaza-level lobby is plain in design [10] and was originally decorated in travertine and bronze, with white wall panels and red carpets. [16] Rather than a traditional coat room, the theater had lockers along its public corridors. [16] [19] [27] Broad, curving double staircases lead to from the lobby to both levels of seating. Below the orchestra, another flight of stairs leads down to the Newhouse Theater. [19] An elevator also connected all the stories. [16]

Primary auditorium

The Beaumont uses steeply sloped stadium seating. [8] [19] Unlike other Broadway theaters, the stage could be configured as a traditional proscenium stage or extended with a thrust stage of varying length. [10] [26] [28] Backstage, there is 10,000 sq ft (930 m2) for set storage. [29] [30] The stage and its backstage facilities take up about 75 percent of the theater's area. [16] [30]

Seating areas
View of auditorium from balcony level. The auditorium has steeply sloped stadium seating, arranged in a semicircle with its ends cut back. Here, the front rows at orchestra level are arranged in a proscenium configuration. These front rows are placed on a turntable; they can be removed whenever a thrust stage is used.

The Broadway League cites the main auditorium as having 1,080 seats, [31] while Playbill gives a figure of 1,069 seats. [23] The main auditorium originally had approximately 1,100 seats, [28] [29] with about 770 in the orchestra level and 330 in the balcony level. [8] [10] [26] [30] [c] The actual capacity depended on the configuration of the stage. [32] Thirty seats at the front of the orchestra can be stored in the basement when thrust stage is used. [26] [30] Additional seats can be removed to make way for vomitories. [16] [27] Consequently, the theater could have 1,146 seats if a proscenium stage were used, or 1,102 seats if there was an orchestra pit in front of the stage. In a thrust-stage configuration, the theater could have 1,113 seats, which was reduced to 1,083 if actors were allowed to pass through the orchestra seating to get to the stage. [32]

The seating is arranged in a semicircle with its ends cut back, allowing adequate sightlines when a traditional proscenium stage is used. [33] A cantilevered walkway leads to the balcony level, [8] which only has five rows of seats, two of which cantilever over the orchestra. [16] [26] [30] In all configurations, every seat is at most 65 ft (20 m) from the stage. [8] [10] [29] The American Seating Company installed the seats, which were originally upholstered in red fabric. Plaques were mounted onto the backs of each seat, indicating the seat number and the name of a donor. [34] The seats were covered with deep burgundy fabric in 1990. [35] [36]

The auditorium had a minimalist decorative scheme. [10] The original decorations comprised dark brown wood and metal, as well as red and gray carpets. [7] [33] The design includes curving oval motifs, which visually connect the two levels of seating with the stage and ceiling. [28] The aisle lights were recessed into the ends of the aisles. Typical theaters had lights embedded within the risers of the stairs in each aisle, but the theater's semicircular arrangement meant that such lights could be distracting to patrons on the opposite side of the auditorium. [33]

Other design features

There are seven removable panels placed across the proscenium opening. [8] [15] [16] When all the panels are removed, the proscenium is 58 ft (18 m) wide; the panels can also be used to seal the proscenium completely. The two outermost panels must be manually removed, while the other five panels can be lifted mechanically using a counterweight system. Because of the presence of the removable panels, the stage curtain is placed in front of the proscenium opening, contrary to in most theaters. The stage curtain is mounted on a curving steel frame, which runs parallel to the 14 ft-deep (4.3 m) stage apron. [16] The entire stage was illuminated with 565 spotlights, hung from four semicircular catwalks and hidden behind "fins" on the ceiling. [16] The Beaumont was the first Broadway theater with an electronic lighting system because, as Mielziner said, "Economically, we can't afford to use old switchboards and old methods". [37] Speakers were installed during the mid-1990s because, as designed, the auditorium had poor acoustics. [38]

The stage covers 11,000 sq ft (1,000 m2). [28] [29] [30] [d] This was far larger than any other Broadway theater's stage at the time; the next largest stage covered 2,914 sq ft (270.7 m2). [16] [26] The Beaumont's thrust stage, when fully extended, is 28 ft (8.5 m) deep and 25 ft (7.6 m) wide and is placed on a lift that can descend to the basement. [16] Lincoln Center's drama consultant Robert Whitehead had wanted the thrust stage, saying: "There is something exciting in the way the action spills out into the audience and the audience embraces it." [39] For productions that use only the thrust stage, performers enter from underneath the stage, and the proscenium is closed off. [26] Various tunnels were provided under the seating areas for this purpose. [19] Since the semicircular seating precluded good views of the rear of the proscenium stage, many of the theater's productions were forced to use the front of the apron. [40] The unconventional mixture of stage designs prompted many designers and directors to avoid the theater entirely. [38]

Beneath the stage is a turntable measuring 46 ft (14 m) across, which allows the thrust stage to be expanded. [8] [16] [26] When the thrust stage was used, the first seven rows of the orchestra could be lowered into the basement. [8] [26] The turntable carries a semicircular floor panel with rows of orchestra seating (for when the theater is configured as a proscenium stage), as well as another semicircular panel with the thrust stage and three rows of seating. Whenever the stage is reconfigured, the lifts beneath the front orchestra rows and the thrust stage are lowered. The semicircular floor panels are then unlocked from the lift and connected to each other before being rotated, disconnected, and raised. [16] A second platform, measuring 5 ft (1.5 m) wide, [16] surrounds the turntable and can move independently. [8] [16]

Off-Broadway spaces

Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater

In the lower level of the building is the Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater, originally known as the Forum when it opened on November 10, 1967. [41] The theater was renamed in 1972 for Mrs. Samuel I. Newhouse, a prominent patron of the theater. [42] Designed by Saarinen and Mielziner, the Newhouse is a 299-seat venue in which Lincoln Center Theater presents its off-Broadway plays and musicals. [15] [7] The Newhouse Theater originally was accessible only through the Beaumont's parking garage. [15] Unlike the larger Broadway theater above, the Newhouse only contains a thrust stage. Its existence came about because, during planning, Lincoln Center's board could not agree on what types of productions the Forum should present. [32]

Claire Tow Theater

In June 2012, LCT opened the Claire Tow Theater on the Beaumont's roof, [43] which features work by emerging playwrights, directors, and designers. The auditorium is named for Claire Tow, whose husband Leonard Tow, an LCT board member, donated $7.5 million. [22] Located on the Beaumont's planted green roof, the Claire Tow Theater seats 112 people. Designed by Hugh Hardy and built for about $41 million, [44] [45] the two-story, 23,000 sq ft (2,100 m2) glass enclosure has the same width as the Beaumont's base. [44] The theater is accessed by elevators within the NYPL section of the building. In addition to the auditorium, the Claire Tow houses rehearsal space, dressing quarters, offices, and a pocket lobby with a bar. The structure is wrapped inside a grille of aluminum louvers that help screen out the sun. [17] Hardy used simple materials for the interior, including stained oak for the lobby floors and walnut for the theater’s sloping walls. [22] The bar features Overture (2012), a sculpture by Kiki Smith. [17] [44]

History

Development

Buildings of Lincoln Center

Buildings and structures in Lincoln Center:
1
Samuel B. and David Rose Building (includes Walter Reade Theater)
2
Juilliard School
3
Alice Tully Hall
4
Vivian Beaumont Theater (includes Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater and Claire Tow Theater)
5
Elinor Bunin Monroe Film Center
6
David Geffen Hall
7
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts (includes Bruno Walter Auditorium)
8
Metropolitan Opera House
9
Josie Robertson Plaza with Revson Fountain
10
Damrosch Park
11
David H. Koch Theater
12
David Rubenstein Atrium
13
Jazz at Lincoln Center

The Lincoln Square Renewal Project had been proposed in 1955 as part of urban planner Robert Moses's urban renewal program. [46] [47] The Lincoln Center performing-arts complex became a key part of the urban renewal, though it was not part of Moses's initial intentions for the site. [47] [48] John D. Rockefeller III led Lincoln Center's development, which from the start included venues for the New York Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera, and New York City Ballet. [48] [49] The first plans for the complex, announced in May 1956, included plans for five commercial theaters. [50] [51] [52] Lincoln Center Inc. was founded in June 1956 to oversee the development, [50] and the company acquired the land in February 1958. [53] [54] [55] Vivian Beaumont Allen, a former actress and heiress to the May Department Stores fortune, donated $3 million in May 1958 for the construction of the repertory theater at Lincoln Center. [56] [57] Lincoln Center's board of directors then pledged to name the theater after Allen, [57] and Rockefeller named Robert Whitehead as the consultant on the repertory theater. [58] [59]

Planning

Wallace Harrison, the architect of the Philharmonic Hall, had declined an offer to design the other buildings in the complex but helped select the other architects. [49] [53] [60] Various prominent architects and engineers were invited as consultants for the development, [53] [61] but Lincoln Center Inc. recommended that only American architects be selected for the final designs. [5] [53] The repertory theater and library were the last two buildings at Lincoln Center for which architects were selected. In November 1958, Eero Saarinen was selected as the architect for the Beaumont Theater, while Gordon Bunshaft was picked to design the performing-arts library. [62] [63] Even though Saarinen was not as well-connected as some of Lincoln Center's other architects, he was both an experienced auditorium designer and a prominent architect in the middle of his career. [60] Whitehead and Harrison had chosen Saarinen for this reason. [19] Shortly afterward, Jo Mielziner was hired to collaborate on the theater's interior design. [64] [65] The complex's general contractors were selected in January 1959. [66]

Originally, the repertory theater and the library were to be separate buildings. [2] Allen expressed concerns that the site allotted to the repertory theater was too small, in part because Moses was intractable in his refusal to reduce the size of the nearby Damrosch Park. [67] After the New York Public Library (NYPL) joined the project in June 1959, [68] the library building and repertory theater were combined by that October, saving both money and space. [69] [70] Saarinen and Bunshaft had decided that "one building could house the two facilities better than two". [14] [71] During late 1959, Elia Kazan was also hired as a consultant for the repertory theater, helping Whitehead select the productions. [72] [73] Whitehead and Kazan established the nonprofit Lincoln Center Repertory Company in February 1960 to oversee the Beaumont's programming. [74] [75]

Only two conflicts between Saarinen and Bunshaft arose during the three-year planning process. Saarinen wanted to use three columns at each of the building's corners, while Bunshaft wanted to use one column; in addition, both architects sought to create the building's technical drawings. In the end, the architects used Bunshaft's column arrangement and Saarinen created the technical drawings. [7] [8] [10] The architects considered and rejected 15 plans for the theater; [15] [26] one such plan envisioned the Beaumont Theater with a concave roof in the center, supported by piers on either side. [10] The final scheme was tested in an unused movie theater in Pontiac, Michigan, where Mielziner drew up plans for theatrical sets he had designed in the past. [15] [27] By August 1960, Saarinen and Mielziner had reportedly finalized their plans for the repertory theater and the basement Forum, [76] but they made minor modifications to these plans before the end of the year. [77]

Construction

In January 1961, the New York state and city governments agreed to fund several buildings in Lincoln Center. The city would provide $12 million in total, including $8.2 million to the library/museum building, but none of the state's funding would go toward the library/museum. [78] The design details were nearly finished when the New York City Council voted that March to withhold its funding for Lincoln Center. [79] [80] This move might have forced a redesign of the theater and library. [81] However, the Rockefeller family (including state governor Nelson Rockefeller) agreed to cover the city's $12 million commitment so the theater could be completed by the 1964 New York World's Fair. [82]

Following Saarinen's sudden death on September 1, 1961, his firm continued to work on the theater's development. [83] The next month, excavation started on the library/theater building's site. [84] That November, Saarinen's firm announced final plans for the repertory theater. Site excavation was more than half finished, and the repertory theater was renamed after Allen at this time. [84] Lincoln Center's directors reported in March 1962 that the Beaumont's completion had been delayed to at least 1964. The delay was caused by the relocation of the repertory group's offices from the Juilliard School building into the library/theater building. [85] Allen never saw her namesake theater completed, as she died in late 1962. [86]

The Lincoln Center Repertory Company intended to premiere productions in 1963, regardless of whether the Beaumont Theater was completed. [87] [88] The theatre company began training in October 1962 [89] [90] and moved into the ANTA Washington Square Theatre, a temporary venue in Greenwich Village, in January 1964. [91] Due to conflicts with Lincoln Center president William Schuman, Whitehead and Kazan resigned and were replaced by Herbert Blau and Jules Irving. [92] [93] By April 1965, Schuman and the repertory company's new president Robert L. Hoguet Jr. promised that the theater would open that June. [94] The next month, a revival of Georg Büchner's play Danton's Death was booked as the Beaumont's inaugural production, and the opening date was pushed to October 21. [95] [96] The library/theater building ultimately cost $17 million, partly funded by $3 million from Allen and $7.5 million from the NYPL. [19] Allen's philanthropic foundation also gave $2.1 million for training the repertory company's members. [27]

Lincoln Center Repertory Company operation

First two seasons

Seen from the elevated plaza

The Beaumont opened to the public on October 12, 1965, with previews of Danton's Death. [27] The Beaumont was dedicated on October 14 [97] and hosted a fundraising gala on October 20, which raised more than $100,000. [98] The theater officially opened on October 21, [99] [e] when regular performances of Danton's Death began. [101] [102] The Beaumont's opening was not as widely reported in the media as some of Lincoln Center's other buildings, but it did receive mostly positive commentary. [7] Progressive Architecture wrote that the theater was "one of the most innovational theater facilities in this country". [6] John Chapman of the New York Daily News called the Beaumont's opening "the most important theatrical event of the 1965–66 season in this city", despite the mediocrity of Danton's Death. [103] Wolf Von Eckardt wrote for The Washington Post that the Beaumont had a "classic" architectural appearance "without sweat or striving". [104] The New York Concrete Board gave the Beaumont an award for the quality of its construction. [105]

The Beaumont frequently starred Philip Bosco, Aline MacMahon, Nancy Marchand, and Robert Symonds in its early productions. [93] The Lincoln Center Repertory Company offered subscriptions to each season of plays at the Beaumont. When the first preview of Danton's Death commenced, there were already 41,500 subscribers for the Beaumont's first season, representing over 90 percent of all available subscriptions. [27] The other productions of the season were revivals of The Country Wife in December 1965, [106] The Condemned of Altona in January 1966, [107] and The Caucasian Chalk Circle in March 1966. [108] While the first season had high grosses, there was much criticism of the plays themselves. [93] [109] Richard P. Cooke of The Wall Street Journal said the Lincoln Center Repertory Company "is still struggling for popular and critical acclaim", despite having both ample funding and up-to-date equipment at the Beaumont. [109] Furthermore, the theater itself ran a deficit of several hundred thousand dollars each season, as the expenses outweighed the profits. [41]

The theater had 31,400 subscribers before the first play of the Beaumont's second season opened in late 1966. [110] The season's first two plays were The Alchemist [111] and Yerma. [112] Blau left at the beginning of 1967, saying: "The climate is no longer right for me to do what I came to do in the form I had in mind." [113] Afterward, the Beaumont produced Galileo in April 1967. [114] [115] [116] Galileo was the first play by an American playwright at the Beaumont, placating critics who objected to the number of plays by foreign authors. [117] Next, Alexander H. Cohen leased the theater [117] for the opening of The Unknown Soldier and His Wife that July. [118] The repertory program was still not successful; The New York Times reported in late 1967 that Lincoln Center's "inability to build a successful repertory theater" was the complex's "greatest shortcoming" creatively. [119] The experimental Forum in the Beaumont's basement opened on November 10, 1967. [41]

Jules Irving management

The third season featured the plays The Little Foxes, Saint Joan, Tiger at the Gates, and Cyrano de Bergerac. As part of the 1968 Lincoln Center Festival, French theatre company Théâtre de la Cité performed The Three Musketeers, George Dandin, and Tartuffe at the Beaumont. [120] This was followed by the play Lovers, also performed as part of the festival. [120] [121] The plays King Lear and A Cry of Players opened at the Beaumont in late 1968, running as a double bill. [120] At the beginning of 1969, Robert Montgomery became the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater's president. [122] [123] The Beaumont hosted the play In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer during much of the remainder of the season, [120] interrupted by a short run of The Miser that May. [124] The Beaumont's fifth season in 1969–1970 featured four American plays: [120] [125] The Time of Your Life, Camino Real, Operation Sidewinder, and Beggar on Horseback. [120] Montgomery resigned in April 1970, a year after his appointment. [126] The sixth season in 1970–1971 was composed entirely of revivals [127] and included The Good Woman of Setzuan, The Playboy of the Western World, An Enemy of the People, and Antigone. [120]

The Beaumont still ran at a loss, despite near-capacity attendance. [122] Amyas Ames, who had become Lincoln Center's chairman in 1970, found the Beaumont Theater was losing $750,000 a year. [128] Lincoln Center's directors forgave $200,000 of the repertory company's debts and agreed to provide another $125,000 a year to cover high overhead costs. [129] In January 1971, City Center proposed taking over the Beaumont and conducting renovations. The plans included relocating the Forum behind the Beaumont's stage and adding three film screens in the Forum space. [128] Mielziner opposed the plans, saying it would compromise the quality of the Beaumont's design, [130] [131] but supporters said the main auditorium would not be touched and that the Forum would only be relocated to a better location. [132] That September, the New York City Board of Estimate approved $5.2 million for the renovations. [130] After Irving testified against the plans the next month, the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater was given the chance to submit an alternate plan for the theater. [133] [134] The theatre company proposed selling 500 annual subscriptions of $1,000 to cover the remaining debt. [135] [136] City Center formally withdrew its plan in December 1971, citing the opposition. [137]

Throughout the dispute over the planned renovation, the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater had scheduled four shows for the Beaumont's seventh season in 1971–1972. [138] Mary Stuart opened in late 1971, followed the next year by Narrow Road to the Deep North, Twelfth Night, and The Crucible. [120] The musical Man of La Mancha, which was not part of the regular season, [139] was revived in mid-1972 to large success. [140] The Beaumont's 1972–1973 season featured Enemies, The Plough and the Stars, The Merchant of Venice, and A Streetcar Named Desire. By then, the Forum was mostly screening films. [120] The Forum's season was canceled in October 1972 due to a lack of funds, and Irving resigned as the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater's artistic director as a direct result. [141] [142] Lincoln Center had granted $150,000 to fund the Beaumont's eighth season but was unwilling to repeat the grant. [142] [143] With Irving gone Lincoln Center's board decided that for the 1973-1974 season they would book a "guest season" of shows from regional theaters. This plan was announced as a one year only plan that would allow more time for a proper search for a new artistic leader and ensure that person time to transition into the job once chosen. [144] [145]

Papp operation

Side view of theater entrance

In March 1973, Joseph Papp of the New York Shakespeare Festival agreed to take over the Beaumont as long as he were able to raise $5 million. [146] [147] Papp used the Beaumont to present new productions and continued to stage experimental shows at The Public Theater. [139] [148] The Forum in the basement would be used for classical plays, a reversal of Irving's policy. [148] Mitzi Newhouse gave Papp a grant of $1 million that May, the largest individual grant ever made for the Shakespeare Festival, [149] [150] and the Forum was named for Newhouse. [151] The Shakespeare Festival's first production at the Beaumont, David Rabe's play In the Boom Boom Room, opened in November 1973 [152] and was followed the next year by Hugh Miller's The Au Pair Man, Ron Milner's What the Wine Sellers Buy, and Miguel Piñero's Short Eyes. Of these, only Short Eyes was successful. [139] [153] During the 1974–1975 season, the Shakespeare Festival presented Anne Burr's Mert & Phil, Bill Gunn's Black Picture Show, Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, and Anthony Scully's Little Black Sheep. As with the previous season, these plays generally had only lukewarm reception. [139]

Papp announced in early 1975 that he would change the Beaumont's programming to revivals of traditional plays and dramas with established performers, citing "hostility" from the audiences. The previous season had only 22,000 subscribers, compared with 27,000 during the 1973–1974 season. He also wanted to raise $3–4 million to renovate the Beaumont with a permanent proscenium stage. [154] [155] In accordance with his new policy, Papp scheduled four revivals for the 1975–1976 season: Trelawny of the "Wells", Hamlet, Mrs. Warren's Profession, and The Threepenny Opera. [156] These plays were generally much more successful, [139] and The Threepenny Opera was extended through the end of 1976. [157] The lengthy run of The Threepenny Opera, as well as financial shortfalls, prompted Papp to delay the beginning of the following season to February 1977, canceling two of the four shows scheduled for the season. [158] Anton Chekhov's play The Cherry Orchard and Aeschylus's classic Agamemnon were the only plays featured during that season. [139] Papp presented plans for a $6.5 million renovation of the Beaumont to Lincoln Center's directors in April 1977. Giorgio Cavaglieri designed a new flexible auditorium, which if approved would be built during the 1978–1979 season. [159]

Papp announced in June 1977 that he would no longer operate the Beaumont, citing increasing operating costs. [160] [161] As a result, The Cherry Orchard was forced to close prematurely in August 1977, with Lincoln Center's directors warning that the theater might be closed for two years. [162] At the time, even a successful season could incur a deficit of $2 million; the previous season had seen operating debts of $6.2 million and ticket sales of only $3.9 million. [160] This was despite the fact that Papp had been able to reach 97 percent of audience capacity for many shows. [148] The theater stayed closed even though there was an ongoing shortage of available theaters for new productions. Lincoln Center's directors said the Beaumont's operating expenses were twice as high as traditional Broadway theaters; it cost $1.55 million to mount a typical production at the Beaumont, compared to $930,000 at a typical Broadway theater. [163]

Attempted revival

Crinkley operation

After Papp's sudden departure, Lincoln Center's directors hurried to make arrangements with other producers and theatrical companies to keep the Beaumont open. [164] During its closure, the Beaumont held a benefit party for Paul Robeson in August 1977. [165] American National Theater and Academy director Richmond Crinkley was named as the Beaumont's director in early 1978. [166] At the end of the year, Woody Allen, Sarah Caldwell, Liviu Ciulei, Robin Phillips, and Ellis Rabb were appointed as the theater's new directors, and Edward Albee was hired as the in-house playwright. [167] [168] The Beaumont's directors leased the theater from Lincoln Center. [169] The following May, the theater signed new contracts with Actors' Equity Association and the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees that allowed the Beaumont to operate as a League of Resident Theatres' venue, thereby decreasing operating costs. [170]

The theater's directors wished to raise $2 million in reserves before reopening the theater, and they wanted to operate for at least one full season. Consequently, the planned reopening in 1979 was pushed back by one year. [171] Crinkley's team wanted to present classics alongside the occasional new production. [172] The directors spent $2 million on improvements, including adding a rehearsal room below the stage and renovating the lobby. [173] In July 1980, the directors announced the lineup for the 1980–1981 season, [173] [174] which began in October with a rehearsal of Philip Barry's comedy The Philadelphia Story. [175] The two other plays that season were a revival of Macbeth and Woody Allen's The Floating Light Bulb. [173] [176] The poor reception to the three plays prompted Crinkley to keep the theater closed after the 1980–1981 season, which put him in conflict with Lincoln Center chairman Martin E. Segal. [177]

Canceled renovation and disputes

Crinkley wanted to convert the Beaumont into a proscenium theater, resolving not only poor sightlines but also inferior acoustics that required some of the more recent plays to use amplification. [40] In May 1981, the Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation granted Lincoln Center $4 million each for the renovations of the Beaumont and State (now Koch) theaters. [178] [179] Frederick R. Koch had pledged $1 million to match the Fox/Samuels grant, and another board member of the Lincoln Center Theater had pledged $500,000. [180] Acoustics expert Cyril Harris and architect I. M. Pei were hired to renovate the Beaumont. In addition to changes to the stage and proscenium opening, the theater would be rebuilt with a shallower raked floor, and the seating capacity would be increased to 1,200. [178] [181] The Beaumont's renovation was planned to cost $6.5 million and begin in November 1981, but the renovation soon encountered delays, as Harris and Pei could not reconcile their disagreement over the proscenium opening's acoustic and esthetic features. [182]

Pei resigned from the project in February 1982 after he was unable to propose a design with which Harris agreed. [183] [184] As a result, Koch withdrew his $1 million grant. [180] Though a new restoration architect was not appointed for several months afterward, Philip Johnson was reportedly working with Harris. [181] [185] Due to increasing renovation costs, Lincoln Center's board considered delaying the renovation indefinitely by mid-1982. [185] The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation withdrew its $4 million grant in November 1982. [186] [187] Leslie R. Samuels said the theater's directors had not raised enough money to cover the rest of the renovation, which had increased to $8 million. [187] By then, Harris was no longer affiliated with the renovation. [186]

Conflicts over the Beaumont's operation persisted through 1983. Lincoln Center's board prioritized reopening the Beaumont for shows, while the theater's directors wanted to renovate the auditorium first. Lincoln Center had requested that the Beaumont's board raise $3 million for a renovation before the end of 1983. Another point of contention was responsibility over maintenance; the NYPL was paying all maintenance expenses for the library/theater building while the Beaumont stood dark, which cost the library an additional $150,000 from 1981 to 1983. [188] Crinkley even objected to the Lincoln Center board's decision in mid-1983 to book the musical La Tragedie de Carmen for the theater, because he had wanted the sole rights to book shows there. [169] In August 1983, Lincoln Center's directors voted to prohibit the Beaumont's board from using either the "Lincoln Center Theater Company" name or $500,000 in annual funds. [189] [190] The Beaumont reopened that November with La Tragedie de Carmen, [191] which ran for 187 performances. [192] At the end of Carmen's run, Lincoln Center's restrictions against the Beaumont board were still in effect, prompting renewed discussions. [193] The Greek National Troupe performed Oedipus Rex in 1984. [194]

Lincoln Center Theater operation

The directors of Lincoln Center and the Beaumont reached an agreement in June 1984 in which the Beaumont's management would be reorganized in exchange for the lifting of restrictions. Ten board members and a new chairman would be hired, the Beaumont's board had to publish a detailed report about their goals, missions, and operations. [195] [196] Accordingly, former New York City mayor John Lindsay was appointed as the Beaumont's chairman in September 1984, [197] [198] and Crinkley stepped down the next month. [199] [200] Lindsay submitted a report at the end of that November, promising an "artistic purpose" and proposing a partnership with Juilliard. [201] Gregory Mosher was hired as the director of the Lincoln Center Theater in April 1985, [202] [203] and Bernard Gersten was appointed as the Beaumont's executive producer that June. [204] Unlike his predecessors, Mosher believed the Beaumont could operate viably without being renovated. [205]

1980s and 1990s

Seen in 2003

The Beaumont's leadership hosted a party at the theater in December 1985 to celebrate its upcoming reopening. [206] The Flying Karamazov Brothers performed a live show at the Beaumont in April 1986, the first at the main auditorium under the new leadership. [207] [f] It was followed the same month by a revival of John Guare's play The House of Blue Leaves, [209] which transferred upstairs from the Newhouse. [210] The 1986–1987 season was the first full season since 1980–1981. [211] The season's offerings consisted of Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur's comedy The Front Page; Wole Soyinka's drama Death and the King’s Horseman; Bill Irwin's mime show The Regard of Flight and The Clown Bagatelles; and Robert Woodruff and The Flying Karamazov Brothers' version of The Comedy of Errors. [192]

LCT made relatively minor changes to the theater in the late 1980s, spending $25,000 on handrails and having productions use the thrust stage. [212] The next production, a revision of Cole Porter's musical Anything Goes, opened in October 1987 [213] [214] and ran for 804 performances over the next two years. [215] [216] LCT's 1988–1989 season was hosted at the Lyceum Theatre as a result of the extended run of Anything Goes. [217] LCT also planned to raise $900,000 for further improvements to the Newhouse and Beaumont. [218] The 1989–1990 season at the Beaumont consisted of two shows: a revival of Paddy Chayefsky's play The Tenth Man [219] and a transfer of Richard Nelson's play Some Americans Abroad. [220] The Beaumont was renovated between these engagements. [35] [36] The renovation cost $1.6 million and included repairing the roof and travertine surfaces, reupholstering the seats, and adding carpets and handrails. [36]

The Guare play Six Degrees of Separation opened at the Beaumont in November 1990, [221] [222] running for 485 performances. [223] LCT started booking solo engagements during nights when shows did not run, [224] starting with Spalding Gray's Monster in a Box monologue in 1991. [225] After André Bishop replaced Mosher in early 1992, [226] Guare's play Four Baboons Adoring the Sun opened at the Beaumont. [192] [227] The musical version of My Favorite Year opened that December, [228] but it was not a success, and neither was a revival of Jane Bowles's In the Summer House in August 1993. [192] Gray returned in November 1993 for his monologue series Gray's Anatomy, [229] shortly before the play Abe Lincoln in Illinois opened; [230] the engagements ran simultaneously. [224] The theatre next produced a recreation of the Royal National Theatre production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical Carousel, which opened in March 1994 [231] [232] [233] and ran for 322 performances. [234] The Beaumont hosted another engagement of Gray's Anatomy that year. [235] Tom Stoppard's play Arcadia ran for 173 performances in 1995. [236] Following complaints over poor acoustics, System for Improved Acoustic Performance installed 88 speakers and some microphones after Arcadia closed. [237] David Hare's play Racing Demon opened that November and had 48 performances. [238]

By the mid-1990s, the Beaumont was finally making a profit. LCT had a $25 million annual budget and had sold all 41,000 subscriptions to the theater, with 12,000 people on a waiting list. [38] In December 1995, LCT announced it would close the Beaumont for an extensive renovation lasting six to eight months, relocating Broadway shows to the Plymouth Theatre. The project was originally estimated to cost $4.7 million. [239] The renovation, led by Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates, [240] involved modifying mechanical systems, improving acoustics, and adding accessible restrooms and seating areas. [239] [240] The work ultimately cost $6.2 million. [38] The Beaumont reopened in November 1996 with the musical Juan Darién: A Carnival Mass. [241] This was followed in 1997 by another revival of The Little Foxes [242] as well as Ivanov. [243] The next year, the theater hosted Eugene O'Neill's comedy Ah, Wilderness!; [244] a revival of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night; [245] and a short-lived musical version of Parade. [246] The last productions of the decade were the revue It Ain't Nothin' But the Blues [247] and the musical Marie Christine in 1999. [248] In addition to these Broadway shows, Spalding Gray returned for two monologues: It's a Slippery Slope in 1996 [249] and Morning, Noon and Night in 1999. [250]

2000s to present

Further modifications to the Beaumont were proposed in the early 2000s, when Lincoln Center planned to renovate the Beaumont's and Newhouse's lobbies for $58 million as part of a larger renovation of the complex. [251] Susan Stroman's musical Contact opened in 2000 and ran for 1,010 performances. [252] The Beaumont continued to host special productions, including concert series and one-time concerts. [224] Two specials ran during Contact's engagement: Patti LuPone's concert series Matters of the Heart in 2000 [253] and the play QED in 2001. [254] Barbara Cook performed the concert series Mostly Sondheim in 2002, [255] followed later that year by the play Dinner at Eight. [256] The Beaumont's 2003–2004 season saw the opening of two Shakespeare revivals ( Part 1 and Part 2 of Henry IV [257] and King Lear [258]), succeeded by another Barbara Cook concert. [259] During late 2004, the Beaumont hosted the musical The Frogs [260] and the play The Rivals. [261] A new entrance was added from 65th Street to the Beaumont Theater's plaza level as part of a mid-2000s renovation. [262]

The musical The Light in the Piazza opened at the Beaumont in April 2005 [263] and had 504 performances over the next year. [264] Subsequently, Stoppard's three-part play The Coast of Utopia occupied the theater. [265] This was followed by a revival of Shakespeare's Cymbeline in 2007, [266] as well as a revival of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific in 2008, [267] the latter of which ran for 1,000 performances. [268] Guare's play A Free Man of Color opened at the Beaumont in 2010 but did not have a long run. [269] The next year, the play War Horse opened, [270] running for 718 performances. [271] The Claire Tow Theater on the Beaumont's roof was approved in 2010, [272] and the new venue opened in June 2012. [43] The Beaumont then hosted Holland Taylor's solo show Ann, [273] as well as a revival of Macbeth, during 2013. [274] James Lapine's play Act One premiered the following year. [275] Next, a revival of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I opened in April 2015 [276] and ran for 499 performances. [277]

J. T. Rogers's play Oslo [278] and Ayad Akhtar's play Junk were then performed during 2017. [279] The next year, Frederick Loewe and Alan Jay Lerner's musical My Fair Lady was revived for 509 performances. [280] Robert Schenkkan's comedy The Great Society had a limited run in late 2019, [281] and the theater was dark when the Broadway industry was shut down in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. [282] The Beaumont reopened on November 11, 2021, with previews of the musical Flying Over Sunset, which had a limited run. [283] This was followed in April 2022 by a limited revival of Thornton Wilder's The Skin of Our Teeth. [284]

Management

Lincoln Center Theater Logo

The Lincoln Center Theater (LCT) is the nonprofit organization that has operated the Beaumont since 1985, after the Beaumont's management was reorganized. [31] LCT operates the Beaumont, Newhouse, and Claire Tow theaters. [285] André Bishop has served as LCT's director since the beginning of 1992, replacing Gregory Mosher. [286] LCT has not had an executive producer since 2013, [287] when Bernard Gersten resigned from the position. [288] [289]

LCT is one of four nonprofit theater companies to own and operate Broadway theaters, along with the Manhattan Theatre Club, the Roundabout Theatre Company, and Second Stage Theater. [290] [291] Consequently, none of the theatre company's employees personally profit from LCT's shows at the Beaumont. Bishop said in 2011 that all profits from shows are used to fund more shows. Particularly successful shows such as South Pacific are used to finance further productions. [292] LCT mostly hosts its Broadway productions at the Beaumont but uses other theaters when the Beaumont is unavailable, starting in the 1988–1989 season. [217] LCT's Broadway productions were also relocated during the Beaumont's 1996 renovation, [239] as well as in the 21st century, such as during the runs of Contact, The Light in the Piazza, and South Pacific. [224]

Notable productions

The following productions are Broadway shows at the Vivian Beaumont Theater's main auditorium. This list does not include shows produced in the off-Broadway venues nor the Lincoln Center Theater's other productions. [31] [23]

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ Pelkonen & Albrecht 2006, p. 214, cites the pool as being 125 feet long, while Stern, Mellins & Fishman 1995, p. 697, gives a length of 120 feet.
  2. ^ Architectural Record 1962, p. 143, gives a different depth of 18 ft (5.5 m). Progressive Architecture 1965, p. 191 gives a slightly differing length of 152 ft (46 m).
  3. ^ Progressive Architecture 1965, p. 192, gave a figure of 1,140 seats, with 779 on orchestra level and 361 in the balcony.
  4. ^ Progressive Architecture 1965, p. 192, cited the stage as occupying 10,000 sq ft (930 m2).
  5. ^ The theater building was still technically not complete; the museum and library around the theater opened in December 1965. [100]
  6. ^ However, the first LCT production was at the Newhouse in December 1985. [208]

Citations

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  3. ^ a b Merkel 2005, p. 176.
  4. ^ a b c d Hughes, Allen (October 21, 1965). "Library and Museum of the Arts At Lincoln Center Ready Soon". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 4, 2022.
  5. ^ a b c Pelkonen & Albrecht 2006, p. 214.
  6. ^ a b c Progressive Architecture 1965, p. 189.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Merkel 2005, p. 178.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Pelkonen & Albrecht 2006, p. 215.
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  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Stern, Mellins & Fishman 1995, p. 697.
  11. ^ "Calder and Moore at Lincoln Center" (PDF). Progressive Architecture. Vol. 46. December 1965. p. 43.
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  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Progressive Architecture 1965, p. 192.
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    Barnes, Clive (November 9, 1973). "Stage: New Papp Home". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
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  232. ^ a b Richards, David (March 25, 1994). "Review/Theater; A 'Carousel' for the 90's Full of Grit and Passion". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  233. ^ Winer, Linda (March 25, 1994). "Rebuilt 'Carousel' A Ride on Dark Side". Newsday. pp. 102, 103, 121. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  234. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 24, 1994). "Carousel – Broadway Musical – 1994 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Carousel (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1994)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  235. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 310.
  236. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 30, 1995). "Arcadia – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Arcadia (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1995)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  237. ^ Gussow, Mel (April 1, 1997). "The Theater As Patient, Clearing Its Throat". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  238. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 20, 1995). "Racing Demon – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Racing Demon (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1995)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "3 Broadway Productions Are to Close". The New York Times. December 30, 1995. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  239. ^ a b c Marks, Peter (December 13, 1995). "Beaumont Theater Plans Its Biggest Makeover". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  240. ^ a b Weathersby, William Jr. (February 1996). "Beaumont rebuilding". TCI. Vol. 30, no. 2. p. 24. ProQuest  209643205.
  241. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 24, 1996). "Juan Darien – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Juan Darien (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1996)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (November 25, 1996). "Child With Inner Jaguar In a 60's Dreamscape". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  242. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 1997). "The Little Foxes – Broadway Play – 1997 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Little Foxes (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (April 28, 1997). "Freud Strays Into a Well-Furnished Foxes' Den Down South". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  243. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 20, 1997). "Ivanov – Broadway Play – 1997 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Ivanov (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (November 21, 1997). "Theater Review; Kline, in Chekhov, Finds Esprit in Ennui". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  244. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 18, 1998). "Ah, Wilderness! – Broadway Play – 1998 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Ah, Wilderness! (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1998)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Marks, Peter (March 19, 1998). "Theater Review; Ah, Wholesomeness! O'Neill With a Smile". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  245. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 16, 1998). "Twelfth Night – Broadway Play – 1998 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Twelfth Night (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1998)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  246. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 17, 1998). "Parade – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Parade (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1998)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (December 18, 1998). "Theater Review; Martyr's Requiem Invokes Justice". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  247. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 26, 1999). "It Ain't Nothin' But the Blues – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "It Ain't Nothin' But the Blues (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1999)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Theater Review; They Call It the Blues, but They Sure Look Like They're Having a Ball". The New York Times. April 27, 1999. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  248. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 2, 1999). "Marie Christine – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Marie Christine (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1999)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (December 3, 1999). "Theater Review; The Promises of an Enchantress". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  249. ^ Marks, Peter (November 11, 1996). "Negotiating The Twists In Skiing And Life". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  250. ^ Marks, Peter (November 12, 1999). "Theater Review; Children's Story: A Day in the Life of Forrest's Dad". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  251. ^ Blumenthal, Ralph (November 7, 2001). "Seeking City Money, Lincoln Center Submits Its Renovation Plans". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  252. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 30, 2000). "Contact – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Contact (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2000)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  253. ^ Weber, Bruce (November 14, 2000). "Theater Review; A Melodious Paean to Love With Spirit and Sincerity". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  254. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 18, 2001). "QED – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "QED (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2001)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (November 19, 2001). "Theater Review; 'QED': Iconoclastic Physicist for All Occasions". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  255. ^ Weber, Bruce (January 15, 2002). "Theater Review; Barbara Cook Takes Sondheim in Fond Stride". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  256. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 19, 2002). "Dinner at Eight – Broadway Play – 2002 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Dinner at Eight (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (December 20, 2002). "Theater Review; Setting the Table for Indigestion". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  257. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 20, 2003). "Henry IV – Broadway Play – 2003 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Henry IV (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2003)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (November 21, 2003). "Theater Review; Falstaff and Hal, With War Afoot". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  258. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 4, 2004). "King Lear – Broadway Play – 2004 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "King Lear (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2004)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (March 5, 2004). "Theater Review; A Fiery Fall Into the Abyss, Unknowing And Unknown". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  259. ^ Holden, Stephen (March 29, 2004). "POP REVIEW; Still Dreaming of Paradise, With Hardheaded Yearning". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  260. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 22, 2004). "The Frogs – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Frogs (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2004)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (July 23, 2004). "Lincoln Center Festival Review; Gods, Greeks and Ancient Shtick". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  261. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 16, 2004). "The Rivals – Broadway Play – 2004 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Rivals (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2004)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Isherwood, Charles (December 17, 2004). "Sheridan's Malaprop and Friends". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  262. ^ Pogrebin, Robin (August 17, 2006). "On 65th Street, Glimpsing Lincoln Center's Future". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  263. ^ a b Laferla, Ruth (June 12, 2005). "Theater; The Skirts In the Piazza". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  264. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 18, 2005). "The Light in the Piazza – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Light in the Piazza (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2005)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  265. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 27, 2006). "The Coast of Utopia [Part 1 - Voyage] – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Coast of Utopia (Part 1: Voyage) (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2006)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Isherwood, Charles (February 4, 2007). "'Utopia' Is a Bore. There, I Said It". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  266. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 2, 2007). "Cymbeline – Broadway Play – 2007 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Cymbeline (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2007)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Isherwood, Charles (December 3, 2007). "Love, War and Betrayal in Busy Lives of the Estranged". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  267. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 4, 2008). "Optimist Awash in the Tropics". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  268. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 3, 2008). "South Pacific – Broadway Musical – 2008 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "South Pacific (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2008)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  269. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 18, 2010). "A Free Man of Color – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "A Free Man of Color (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2010)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (November 19, 2010). "A Gaudy Swashbuckle Through History". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  270. ^ Rooney, David (December 15, 2011). "A Lad and a Geezer Bond Over a Tractor". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  271. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 14, 2011). "War Horse – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "War Horse (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2011)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Piepenburg, Erik (September 4, 2012). "'War Horse' to Close in January". ArtsBeat. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  272. ^ Pogrebin, Robin (February 3, 2010). "New Theater: Lincoln Center Raises the Roof". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 4, 2022.
  273. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 7, 2013). "Ann – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Ann (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2013)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Piepenburg, Erik (June 12, 2013). "'Ann' to Close on Broadway". ArtsBeat. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  274. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 21, 2013). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 2013 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Macbeth (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2013)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  275. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 17, 2014). "Act One – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Act One (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2014)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  276. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (April 17, 2015). "Review: 'The King and I,' Back on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  277. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 16, 2015). "The King and I – Broadway Musical – 2015 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The King and I (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2015)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  278. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 13, 2017). "Oslo – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Oslo (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2017)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (April 14, 2017). "Review: 'Oslo' Fills a Large Canvas in a Thrilling Production". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  279. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 2, 2017). "Junk – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Junk (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2017)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Brantley, Ben (November 3, 2017). "Review: 'Junk' Revives a Go-Go Era of Debt and Duplicity". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  280. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 19, 2018). "My Fair Lady – Broadway Musical – 2018 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "My Fair Lady (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2018)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Green, Jesse (April 20, 2018). "Review: Whose 'Fair Lady'? This Time, Eliza's in Charge". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  281. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 1, 2019). "The Great Society – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Great Society (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2019)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Green, Jesse (October 2, 2019). "Review: In 'The Great Society,' Another Presidential Nightmare". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  282. ^ Paulson, Michael (April 8, 2020). "Broadway Will Remain Closed at Least Until June, and Probably Longer". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  283. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 13, 2021). "Flying Over Sunset – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Flying Over Sunset (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2021)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Green, Jesse (December 14, 2021). "Review: In 'Flying Over Sunset,' Getting High With the Stars". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  284. ^ a b The Broadway League. "The Skin of Our Teeth – Broadway Play – 2022 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Skin of Our Teeth (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2022)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Soloski, Alexis (April 26, 2022). "'The Skin of Our Teeth' Review: A Party for the End of the World". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved April 27, 2022.
  285. ^ "Lincoln Center Theater". NYC-ARTS. July 25, 2012. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  286. ^ "Lincoln Center Theater Names Andre Bishop". The New York Times. March 29, 1991. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  287. ^ Horwitz, Simi (November 5, 2019). "Bernard Gersten Takes a Final Bow at Lincoln Center". Back Stage. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  288. ^ "Bernard Gersten Will Step Down As Executive Producer of Lincoln Center Theater". Playbill. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  289. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (July 10, 2012). "Gersten To Step Down at Lincoln Center Theater". ArtsBeat. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  290. ^ Gerard, Jeremy (April 18, 2015). "Helen Hayes Theatre Sold For $24.7M, Adding Fourth Nonprofit To Broadway's Bazaar". Deadline. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  291. ^ Cox, Gordon (June 7, 2016). "Intersection of Broadway and Non-Profits Boost Creative and Commercial Growth". Variety. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  292. ^ Healy, Patrick (December 17, 2011). "Nonprofit Companies Enjoying, Well, Profits". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  293. ^ The Broadway League (October 21, 1965). "Danton's Death – Broadway Play – 1965 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Danton's Tod (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  294. ^ Taubman, Howard (December 10, 1965). "Theater: Wycherley's 'Country Wife; Lincoln Center Troupe Presents Comedy". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  295. ^ Kauffmann, Stanley (February 4, 1966). "Theater: Sartre Drama; 'Condemned of Altona' at Vivian Beaumont The Cast". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  296. ^ Kauffmann, Stanley (March 25, 1966). "The Theater: At Last, The Caucasian Chalk Circle'; Bertolt Brecht's Play Has Local Premiere". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  297. ^ Kerr, Walter (October 14, 1966). "The Theater: Ben Jonson's 'Alchemist'; Comedy Is Staged by Irving at Beaumont". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  298. ^ Kerr, Walter (December 9, 1966). "Theater: 'Yerma' at Lincoln Center; Gloria Foster Appears in Garcia Lorca Work The Cast". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  299. ^ Kerr, Walter (July 7, 1967). "Theater: Ustinov's 'Unknown Soldier'; Antiwar Entertainment Opens at Beaumont". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  300. ^ The Broadway League (October 26, 1967). "The Little Foxes – Broadway Play – 1967 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Little Foxes (Broadway, Ethel Barrymore Theatre, 1967)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  301. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 27, 1967). "Theater: Return of 'The Little Foxes'; Hellman Play Staged by Lincoln Troupe". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  302. ^ The Broadway League (January 4, 1968). "Saint Joan – Broadway Play – 1968 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Saint Joan (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  303. ^ Barnes, Clive (January 5, 1968). "The Theater: Shaw's 'Saint Joan' at Lincoln Center; Diana Sands Is Notable as Maid of Orleans". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  304. ^ The Broadway League (February 29, 1968). "Tiger at the Gates – Broadway Play – 1968 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Tiger at the Gates (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  305. ^ Barnes, Clive (March 1, 1968). "Theater: Jean Giraudoux's 'Tiger' Returns With Fewer Teeth; Play About Trojan War Opens at Beaumont Anthony Quayle Directs With Assurance". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  306. ^ The Broadway League (April 25, 1968). "Cyrano de Bergerac – Broadway Play – 1968 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Cyrano de Bergerac (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  307. ^ Barnes, Clive (April 26, 1968). "Theater: 'Cyrano' Anew; Rostand Play Is Given by Lincoln Repertory". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  308. ^ The Broadway League (June 25, 1968). "The Three Musketeers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
    "The Three Musketeers (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  309. ^ Shepard, Richard F. (June 26, 1968). "Theater: Gallic Comedy; Lyons Troupe Offers 'The 3 Musketeers'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  310. ^ The Broadway League (June 27, 1968). "George Dandin – Broadway Play – 1968 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "George Dandin (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  311. ^ Shepard, Richard F. (June 28, 1968). "The Theatre de la Cite Offers Moliere's 'George Dandin'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  312. ^ The Broadway League (July 2, 1968). "Tartuffe – Broadway Play – 1968 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Tartuffe (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  313. ^ Sullivan, Dan (July 3, 1968). "The Theater: 'Tartuffe' Reinterpreted; Planchon's Company Is at Vivian Beaumont Play Is Now a Tragedy With a Few Laughs". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  314. ^ The Broadway League (July 25, 1968). "Lovers – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Lovers (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  315. ^ The Broadway League (November 7, 1968). "King Lear – Broadway Play – 1968 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "King Lear (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  316. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 8, 1968). "Theater: Lincoln Repertory Presents 'King Lear'; Production Is Directed by Gerald Freedman Lee J. Cobb in Title Role at Vivian Beaumont". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  317. ^ The Broadway League (November 14, 1968). "A Cry of Players – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "A Cry of Players (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  318. ^ Barnes, Clive (November 15, 1968). "Theater: 'A Cry of Players' Opens; Lincoln Troupe Offers William Gibson Work With Anne Bancroft and Frank Langella". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  319. ^ Barnes, Clive (May 9, 1969). "Stage: Farcical 'Miser'; Lincoln Center Version Stars Robert Symonds". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  320. ^ The Broadway League (November 6, 1969). "The Time of Your Life – Broadway Play – 1969 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Time of Your Life (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1969)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (November 7, 1969). "Stage: Saroyan Dated; ' Time of Your Life' by Lincoln Repertory". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  321. ^ The Broadway League (January 8, 1970). "Camino Real – Broadway Play – 1970 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Camino Real (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1970)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Funke, Lewis (January 8, 1970). "Williams Revival? Ask the Playwright". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  322. ^ The Broadway League (March 12, 1970). "Operation Sidewinder – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Operation Sidewinder (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1970)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (March 13, 1970). "Stage Lizard vs. Snake". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  323. ^ The Broadway League (May 14, 1970). "Beggar on Horseback – Broadway Play – 1970 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Beggar on Horseback (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1970)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (May 15, 1970). "Stage: 'Beggar on Horseback' Returns". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  324. ^ The Broadway League (November 5, 1970). "The Good Woman of Setzuan – Broadway Play – 1970 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Good Woman of Setzuan (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1970)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (November 6, 1970). "The Theater: Brecht's 'Good Woman'". The New York Times. p. 44. ISSN  0362-4331. ProQuest  117808117.
  325. ^ The Broadway League (January 7, 1971). "The Playboy of the Western World – Broadway Play – 1971 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Playboy of the Western World (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1971)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (January 8, 1971). "'Playboy', Opening Here, Marks Synge Jubilee". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  326. ^ The Broadway League (March 11, 1971). "An Enemy of the People – Broadway Play – 1971 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "An Enemy of the People (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1971)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (March 12, 1971). "Stage: Miller Version of 'An Enemy of the People' Issues Take Ascendancy Over Characters". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  327. ^ The Broadway League (May 13, 1971). "Antigone – Broadway Play – 1971 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Antigone (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1971)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (May 14, 1971). "Theater: Poor Antigone!". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  328. ^ The Broadway League (November 12, 1971). "Mary Stuart – Broadway Play – 1971 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Mary Stuart (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1971)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (November 13, 1971). "Theater: Success in a Great but Difficult Work". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  329. ^ The Broadway League (January 6, 1972). "Narrow Road to the Deep North – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Narrow Road to the Deep North (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (January 7, 1972). "Stage: 'Narrow Road to Deep North'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  330. ^ The Broadway League (March 2, 1972). "Twelfth Night – Broadway Play – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Twelfth Night (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (March 3, 1972). "Stage: Magic View of 'Twelfth Night'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  331. ^ The Broadway League (April 27, 1972). "The Crucible – Broadway Play – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Crucible (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (April 28, 1972). "'Stage: Miller's 'Crucible'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  332. ^ The Broadway League (June 22, 1972). "Man of La Mancha – Broadway Musical – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Man of La Mancha (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Thompson, Howard (June 23, 1972). "Return of 'La Mancha'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  333. ^ The Broadway League (November 9, 1972). "Enemies – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Enemies (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1972)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (November 10, 1972). "The Theater: Rising to the Occasion of 'Enemies'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  334. ^ The Broadway League (January 4, 1973). "The Plough and the Stars – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Plough and the Stars (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1973)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (January 5, 1973). "Stage: O'Casey's 'Plough and Stars' at Beaumont". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  335. ^ The Broadway League (March 1, 1973). "The Merchant of Venice – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Merchant of Venice (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1973)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (March 5, 1973). "Stage: Modern 'Venice'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  336. ^ The Broadway League (April 26, 1973). "A Streetcar Named Desire – Broadway Play – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "A Streetcar Named Desire (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1973)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (April 27, 1973). "Stage: A Rare 'Streetcar'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  337. ^ The Broadway League (May 23, 1974). "Short Eyes – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Short Eyes (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1974)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "'Short Eyes' Moves to the Beaumont". The New York Times. May 24, 1974. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  338. ^ The Broadway League (January 6, 1975). "Black Picture Show – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Black Picture Show (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  339. ^ The Broadway League (March 5, 1975). "A Doll's House – Broadway Play – 1975 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "A Doll's House (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (January 7, 1975). "'Black Picture Show,' a Tale of Corruption". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  340. ^ The Broadway League (October 15, 1975). "Trelawny of the "Wells" – Broadway Play – 1975 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Trelawny of the "Wells" (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Barnes, Clive (October 16, 1975). "The Stage: Papp Transplants Pinero's 'Trelawny'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  341. ^ The Broadway League (December 17, 1975). "Hamlet – Broadway Play – 1975 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Hamlet (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Gussow, Mel (December 18, 1975). "Stage: Mercurial Prince for Beaumont's 'Hamlet'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  342. ^ The Broadway League (February 18, 1976). "Mrs. Warren's Profession – Broadway Play – 1976 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Mrs. Warren's Profession (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1976)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  343. ^ The Broadway League (February 17, 1977). "The Cherry Orchard – Broadway Play – 1977 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Cherry Orchard (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1977)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  344. ^ The Broadway League (May 18, 1977). "Agamemnon – Broadway Play – 1977 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Agamemnon (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1977)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
  345. ^ The Broadway League (November 14, 1980). "The Philadelphia Story – Broadway Play – 1980 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Philadelphia Story (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1980)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Rich, Frank (November 17, 1980). "Stage: 'Philadelphia Story' Reopens the Beaumont". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  346. ^ The Broadway League (January 22, 1981). "Macbeth – Broadway Play – 1981 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Macbeth (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Rich, Frank (January 24, 1981). "Stage: 'Macbeth' Returns". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  347. ^ The Broadway League (April 27, 1981). "The Floating Light Bulb – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Floating Light Bulb (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Rich, Frank (April 28, 1981). "Stage: 'Light Bulb,' by Woody Allen". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 9, 2022.
  348. ^ The Broadway League (November 23, 1986). "The Front Page – Broadway Play – 1986 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Front Page (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1986)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Rich, Frank (November 24, 1986). "Stage: 'The Front Page,' at the Vivian Beaumont". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  349. ^ The Broadway League (March 1, 1987). "Death and the King's Horseman – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "Death and the King's Horseman (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1987)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Rich, Frank (March 2, 1987). "Stage: Soyinka's 'Death and the King's Horseman'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  350. ^ The Broadway League (May 31, 1987). "The Comedy of Errors – Broadway Play – 1987 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    "The Comedy of Errors (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 1987)". Playbill. Retrieved March 7, 2022.
    Gussow, Mel (June 1, 1987). "The Stage: 'Comedy of Errors'". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  351. ^ Nightingale, Benedict (March 19, 1995). "Theater; A Human Blender Creates an Arcadia". The New York Times. ISSN  0362-4331. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  352. ^ The Broadway League. "Camelot – Broadway Musical – 2022 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved May 25, 2022.
    "Camelot (Broadway, Vivian Beaumont Theater, 2022)". Playbill. March 28, 2022. Retrieved May 25, 2022.

Sources

External links