PhotosLocation


Shiawassee_County,_Michigan Latitude and Longitude:

42°57′N 84°08′W / 42.95°N 84.14°W / 42.95; -84.14
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shiawassee County
Shiawassee County Courthouse in Corunna
Map of Michigan highlighting Shiawassee County
Location within the U.S. state of Michigan
Map of the United States highlighting Michigan
Michigan's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 42°57′N 84°08′W / 42.95°N 84.14°W / 42.95; -84.14
Country United States
State  Michigan
FoundedSeptember 10, 1822 (created)
1837 (organized) [1]
Named for Shiawassee River
Seat Corunna
Largest city Owosso
Area
 • Total541 sq mi (1,400 km2)
 • Land531 sq mi (1,380 km2)
 • Water10 sq mi (30 km2)  1.9%
Population
 ( 2020)
 • Total68,094
 • Density130/sq mi (51/km2)
Time zone UTC−5 ( Eastern)
 • Summer ( DST) UTC−4 ( EDT)
Congressional district 7th
Website shiawassee.net

Shiawassee County ( /ˌʃəˈwɒsi/ shy-ə-WAH-see) is a county located in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2020 United States Census, the population was 68,094. The county seat is Corunna, [2] and the largest city in the county is Owosso. In 2010, the center of population of Michigan was located in Shiawassee County, in Bennington Township. [3]

Shiawassee County is included in the Lansing- East Lansing, MI Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History

In 1822, the Michigan Territorial legislature defined a new county, Shiawassee (named for the river), taken from portions of existing Oakland and St. Clair counties. However, for purposes of representation, revenue, and judicial matters, the area was temporarily assigned to adjoining county governments. [1] In early 1837, the Michigan Territory was admitted into the Union as the State of Michigan, and that same year the new Michigan State government authorized the organization of a county government in Shiawassee. [1]

Geography

According to the US Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 541 square miles (1,400 km2), of which 531 square miles (1,380 km2) is land and 10 square miles (26 km2) (1.9%) is water. [4] The Shiawassee River enters it from Genesee County in the southeast and flows through Corunna and Owosso in the center of the county, exiting to Saginaw County in the north. Shiawassee County is considered to be a part of Central Michigan.

Adjacent counties

Transportation

Highways

  • I-69 - enters near SW corner of county. Runs ENE past Shaftsburg, Perry, Morrice, Bancroft, Durand. Exits running east into Genesee County.
  • M-13 - runs along the east line of county, from NE corner to intersection with I69 one mile (1.6 km) south of Lennon.
  • M-21 - runs east–west through upper middle of county, passing Corunna and Owosso.
  • M-52 - enters north line of county at Oakley. Runs south to Owosso, then SW and south to Perry. Exits running south into Ingham County.
  • M-71 - begins at Owosso. Runs ESE to intersection with I69, one mile (1.6 km) NW of Durand.

Rail

Airport

Owosso Community Airport – 2 miles (3.2 km) east of Owosso. Public airport for general aviation, primarily smaller aircraft.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.Note
18402,103
18505,230148.7%
186012,349136.1%
187020,85868.9%
188027,05929.7%
189030,95214.4%
190033,8669.4%
191033,246−1.8%
192035,9248.1%
193039,51710.0%
194041,2074.3%
195045,96711.6%
196053,44616.3%
197063,07518.0%
198071,14012.8%
199069,770−1.9%
200071,6872.7%
201070,648−1.4%
202068,094−3.6%
US Decennial Census [5]
1790-1960 [6] 1900-1990 [7]
1990-2000 [8] 2010-2018

As of the 2010 United States Census, [9] Shiawassee County had a 2010 population of 70,648. This decrease of -1,039 people from the 2000 United States Census represents a decrease of 1.4% during that ten-year period. In 2010 there were 27,481 households and 19,397 families in the county. The population density was 133.1 per square mile (51.4 per square kilometer). There were 30,319 housing units at an average density of 57.1 per square mile (22.0/km2). 96.7% of the population were White, 0.5% Native American, 0.5% Black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.5% of some other race and 1.5% of two or more races. 2.4% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race). 22.2% were of German, 21.8% English, 9.5% Irish, 5.2% French, French Canadian or Cajun and 5.1% Polish ancestry according to 2010 American Community Survey. [10]

There were 27,481 households, out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were husband and wife families, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.4% were non-families, and 24.2% were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 2.99.

The county population contained 24.1% under age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 23.9% from 25 to 44, 29.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.6 males.

The 2010 American Community Survey 1-year estimate [9] indicates the median income for a household in the county was $46,528 and the median income for a family was $52,614. Males had a median income of $32,155 versus $19,301 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,103. About 10.6% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.1% of those under the age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Shiawassee County has tended to vote Republican since the beginning. Since 1884, the Republican Party nominee has carried 74% of the elections (25 of 34).

United States presidential election results for Shiawassee County, Michigan [11]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 23,149 58.90% 15,347 39.05% 805 2.05%
2016 19,230 56.37% 12,546 36.78% 2,335 6.85%
2012 15,962 47.39% 17,197 51.06% 520 1.54%
2008 16,268 44.67% 19,397 53.27% 750 2.06%
2004 19,407 52.95% 16,881 46.06% 363 0.99%
2000 15,816 49.09% 15,520 48.17% 882 2.74%
1996 11,714 38.56% 14,662 48.27% 3,999 13.17%
1992 10,930 33.78% 12,629 39.03% 8,801 27.20%
1988 15,506 53.94% 13,056 45.42% 186 0.65%
1984 18,756 65.97% 9,514 33.46% 161 0.57%
1980 15,756 51.71% 11,985 39.33% 2,729 8.96%
1976 15,113 54.52% 12,202 44.02% 406 1.46%
1972 15,489 61.62% 8,932 35.53% 715 2.84%
1968 11,465 50.88% 8,619 38.25% 2,448 10.86%
1964 7,786 36.21% 13,676 63.60% 41 0.19%
1960 13,757 60.86% 8,773 38.81% 74 0.33%
1956 14,600 67.75% 6,873 31.89% 78 0.36%
1952 13,562 68.41% 6,056 30.55% 206 1.04%
1948 10,377 66.97% 4,852 31.31% 267 1.72%
1944 11,601 68.41% 5,292 31.21% 64 0.38%
1940 9,995 63.24% 5,727 36.24% 82 0.52%
1936 6,017 43.36% 6,666 48.03% 1,195 8.61%
1932 6,600 44.19% 8,002 53.58% 334 2.24%
1928 9,851 79.40% 2,496 20.12% 60 0.48%
1924 8,987 72.99% 1,738 14.12% 1,588 12.90%
1920 7,194 69.93% 2,595 25.23% 498 4.84%
1916 3,926 51.29% 3,308 43.22% 420 5.49%
1912 2,309 30.05% 1,957 25.47% 3,417 44.47%
1908 4,199 57.96% 2,339 32.28% 707 9.76%
1904 5,553 66.19% 2,241 26.71% 596 7.10%
1900 5,051 56.69% 3,441 38.62% 418 4.69%
1896 4,654 50.50% 4,303 46.69% 259 2.81%
1892 3,619 47.17% 2,994 39.02% 1,060 13.81%
1888 4,007 51.91% 3,187 41.29% 525 6.80%
1884 2,705 41.71% 3,141 48.43% 640 9.87%

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, records deeds, mortgages, and vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget and has limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

COVID-19 hazard pay scandal

On July 25, 2021, it was revealed that the county's board of commissioners paid themselves a total of $65,000 out of a $557,000 federal relief funds earmarked for county employee hazard pay due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Employees typically received $1,000 to $2,000. The seven member board of commissioners voted themselves $5,000 for four members, $10,000 for two, and the chairman of the county commissioners $25,000. Following days of criticism, a Shiawassee prosecutor declared the bonuses illegal; commissioners responded that they would return the money. [12]

Elected officials

  • Governor: Gretchen Whitmer (D)
  • Lt. Governor: Garlin Gilchrist (D)
  • Attorney General: Dana Nessel (D)
  • Secretary of State: Jocelyn Benson (D)
  • U.S. Rep 7th District: Elissa Slotkin (D)
  • State Senator 28th District: Sam Singh (D)
  • State Rep. 71st District: Brian BeGole (R)
  • Prosecutor: Scott Koerner (R)
  • Sheriff: Doug Chapman (R)
  • County Clerk: Caroline Wilson (R)
  • County Treasurer: Julie Sorenson (R)
  • Register of Deeds: Lori Kimble (R)
  • Drain Commissioner: Tony Newman (D)
  • County Surveyor: William Wascher (R)
  • Road Commissioners: Mike Constine (R); Ric Crawford (R); John Michalec (D)
  • Commissioner District 1: Marlene Webster (R)
  • Commissioner District 2: Greg Brodeur (R)
  • Commissioner District 3: Gary Holzhausen (R)
  • Commissioner District 4: Bill Johnson (R)
  • Commissioner District 5: Brad Howard (R)
  • Commissioner District 6: Cindy Garber (R)
  • Commissioner District 7: Tom Emery (R)

(information as of January 2023)

Communities

U.S. Census data map showing local municipal boundaries within Shiawassee County. Shaded areas represent incorporated cities.

Cities

Villages

Charter townships

Civil townships

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Bibliography on Shiawassee County". Clarke Historical Library, Central Michigan University. Retrieved January 29, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties.
  3. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 2, 2014.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  5. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2010. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  9. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  10. ^ "2010 Data Release – Data & Documentation – American Community Survey – US Census Bureau". census.gov. Archived from the original on October 27, 2015.
  11. ^ US Election Atlas
  12. ^ "Michigan Republicans will return Covid relief funds used to pay own bonuses". The Guardian. July 25, 2021.

External links

42°57′N 84°08′W / 42.95°N 84.14°W / 42.95; -84.14