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Olympique Lyonnais Féminin
Full nameOlympique Lyonnais Féminin
Nickname(s)Les Fenottes
Les Lyonnaises
Short nameOL
Founded1970; 54 years ago (1970) (as FC Lyon)
2004; 20 years ago (2004) (as Olympique Lyonnais)
GroundStade Gérard Houllier, Décines-Charpieu
Capacity1,524
Owner Michele Kang (52,00%) [1]
OL Groupe (48,00%)
President Michele Kang
Manager Sonia Bompastor
League Division 1 Féminine
2022–23Division 1 Féminine, 1st of 12 (champions)
Website Club website
Current season

Olympique Lyonnais Féminin (French pronunciation: [ɔlɛ̃pik ljɔnɛ]; commonly referred to as Olympique Lyon, Lyon, or simply OL) is a French women's professional football club based in Lyon. The club has been the female section of Olympique Lyonnais since 2004. It is the most successful club in the history of Division 1 Féminine, with fifteen league titles as Olympique Lyonnais and four league titles as FC Lyon before the acquisition.

Since the 2010s, Lyon has frequently been named the strongest women's team in the world, [2] and has been cited as a model for the development of women's football in both economic and cultural terms. [3] The team has won eight Champions League titles, including a record five successive titles from 2016 to 2020, as well as 14 consecutive domestic league titles from 2007 to 2020. They have also won five trebles when the top-level continental competition is considered, the most for any team.

History

The club was formed as the women's section of FC Lyon in 1970. In 2004, the women's club became the women's section of Olympique Lyonnais. Since joining Lyon, the women's section has won the Division 1 Féminine fourteen times and the Coupe de France nine times. Lyon reached the semi-finals of the 2007–08 edition of the UEFA Women's Cup and, during the 2009–10 season, reached the final of the inaugural edition of the UEFA Women's Champions League, losing to German club Turbine Potsdam 7–6 on penalties. [4] [5] In the following season, Lyon finally captured the UEFA Women's Champions League, defeating its nemesis Turbine Potsdam 2–0 in the 2011 final. It successfully defended its title in 2012, defeating FFC Frankfurt in the final.

From 2016 to 2020, the club won five consecutive Champions League titles, equaling the male record held by Real Madrid. Three players: Sarah Bouhaddi, Wendie Renard, and Eugénie Le Sommer have all won eight Champions League trophies.

Lyon's main rivalry is with Paris Saint-Germain, with matches between the two teams sometimes referred as the "Classique féminin". Paris is OL's main contender for national titles, as they finished in second place of D1 Féminine seven times. Lyon had never lost the D1 title to PSG until 2021 when PSG finished ahead of Lyon, and won five Coupe de France finals against Paris. In 2017 both teams reached the Champions League final, with Lyon beating Paris after a penalty shoot-out and winning its fourth title in the competition. [6]

Lyon hosts its matches at the Stade Gérard Houllier, a stadium of capacity 1,524 located in the Groupama OL Training Center and situated not far from the larger Parc Olympique Lyonnais where the male teams play. The women's team does host its "big" matches at the 59,000-seat stadium. The president of the club is Jean-Michel Aulas and the captain of the team is Wendie Renard. According to the UEFA women's coefficient, Lyon was the highest-ranked club in UEFA in 2014. [7]

Ownership and finances

Lyon Féminin is part of OL Groupe, whose majority shareholder since December 2022 is Eagle Football Group, which is controlled by American businessman John Textor. Club president Jean-Michel Aulas was also OL Groupe's previous and founding owner, and remains a minority owner of OL Groupe and board director of Eagle Football Group. [1] [8] [9]

As of April 2023, L'Équipe reported that Lyon Féminin operated at a €12 million annual deficit. [1]

On 16 May 2023, OL Groupe and Y. Michele Kang announced the formation of a separate entity that would be composed of Kang's Washington Spirit of the NWSL, and Olympique Lyon Féminin. OL Groupe would sell its NWSL club, OL Reign, to resolve conflicts of interest. OL Groupe would retain a 48% stake in the resulting new entity, and Kang would become the club's majority owner and CEO, pending regulatory approval. [10] [11] [12] [13] Kang's proposed deal for the women's side reportedly valued it at $54.4 million. [14] Kang attended Lyon's victory in the Coupe de France féminine finals on 13 May 2023 and raised the trophy with the team. [13] [15]

Players

Current squad

As of 18 February 2024. [16]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK Chile  CHI Christiane Endler
3 DF France  FRA Wendie Renard ( captain)
4 DF France  FRA Selma Bacha
5 DF France  FRA Perle Morroni
6 MF Haiti  HAI Melchie Dumornay
7 MF France  FRA Amel Majri
8 MF Germany  GER Sara Däbritz
9 FW France  FRA Eugénie Le Sommer
10 MF Germany  GER Dzsenifer Marozsán
11 FW France  FRA Kadidiatou Diani
12 DF Australia  AUS Ellie Carpenter
13 MF Netherlands  NED Damaris Egurrola
14 FW Norway  NOR Ada Hegerberg
15 DF France  FRA Wassa Sangaré
16 GK France  FRA Féerine Belhadj
No. Pos. Nation Player
17 MF Netherlands  NED Daniëlle van de Donk
18 DF France  FRA Alice Sombath
19 DF France  FRA Kysha Sylla
20 FW France  FRA Delphine Cascarino
21 DF Canada  CAN Vanessa Gilles (on loan from Angel City)
22 MF Switzerland  SUI Sally Julini
23 DF France  FRA Julie Swierot
24 DF France  FRA Alice Marques
26 MF United States  USA Lindsey Horan
27 FW France  FRA Vicki Bècho
29 DF France  FRA Griedge Mbock Bathy
30 GK Germany  GER Laura Benkarth
31 FW France  FRA Liana Joseph
32 MF France  FRA Maeline Mendy
34 MF France  FRA Laureen Oillic

Out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
FW France  FRA Inès Benyahia (at Le Havre until 30 June 2024)
FW France  FRA Melvine Malard (at Manchester United until 30 June 2024)

Notable former players

Current staff

As of 23 August 2023. [17]
Position Staff
Manager France Sonia Bompastor
Assistant manager France Camille Abily
Assistant coaches France Méline Gérard
France Théo Rivrin
Goalkeeping coach France Simon Pouplin
Head of performance France Antonin Da Fonseca
Physical trainer France Rémi Pullara
Video analyst France Marceau Goguer
Medical director France Franck Pelissier
Doctor France Claire De Labachelerie
Physiotherapists Japan Shingo Kitada
France Anthony Martin
France Ganaelle Rigondaud
Nutritionist France Isabelle Mischler
General manager/team delegate France Olivier Blanc
Equipment manager France Julien Legrand
Kit manager Spain Amilcar Perez
France Jacques Raffin
OMS cell manager France Nadi Ferran
Team coordinator France Manon Eleure

Honours

Celebration of the sixth UEFA Women's Champions League in 2019.

Official

(16, record): 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2021–22, 2022–23
(10, record): 2007–08, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2022–23
(3, record) 2019, 2022, 2023
(8, record): 2010–11, 2011–12, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18, 2018–19, 2019–20, 2021–22

Invitational

Winners: 2012
Winners: 2014
Winners: 2019, 2022
  • Trophée Veolia Féminin
Winners: 2020

Others

Record in UEFA Women's Champions League

As of match played 21 December 2022

All results (away, home and aggregate) list Lyon's goal tally first.

Competition Pld W D L GF GA GD
UEFA Champions League 129 101 17 10 466 64 +402
Total 129 101 17 10 466 64 +402
Season Round Opponents Away Home Agg.
2007–08 First qualifying round Slovakia Slovan Duslo Šaľa 12–0
North Macedonia Škiponjat Struga (Host) 10–0
Bosnia and Herzegovina Sarajevo 7–0
Second qualifying round Denmark Brøndby 0–0
Norway Kolbotn 1–0
Czech Republic Sparta Prague 2–1
Quarter-final England Arsenal 3–2 0–0 f 3–2
Semi-final Sweden Umeå 0–0 1–1 f 1–1 ( a)
2008–09 Second qualifying round Austria Neulengbach 8–0
Switzerland Zürich 7–1
England Arsenal 3–0
Quarter-final Italy Verona 5–0 f 4–1 9–1
Semi-final Germany Duisburg 1–3 1–1 f 2–4
2009–10 Round of 32 Serbia Mašinac Niš 1–0 f 5–0 6–0
Round of 16 Denmark Fortuna Hjørring 1–0 f 5–0 6–0
Quarter-final Italy Torres Sassari 0–1 3–0 f 3–1
Semi-final Sweden Umeå 0–0 3–2 f 3–2
Final Germany Turbine Potsdam 0–0 ( a.e.t.) (6–7 p) ( Spain Getafe)
2010–11 Round of 32 Netherlands AZ 2–1 f 8–0 10–1
Round of 16 Russia Rossiyanka Khimki 6–1 f 5–0 11–1
Quarter-final Russia Zvezda Perm 0–0 f 1–0 1–0
Semi-final England Arsenal 3–2 2–0 f 5–2
Final Germany Turbine Potsdam 2–0 ( England London)
2011–12 Round of 32 Romania Olimpia Cluj-Napoca 9–0 f 3–0 12–0
Round of 16 Czech Republic Sparta Prague 6–0 f 6–0 12–0
Quarter-final Denmark Brøndby 4–0 4–0 f 8–0
Semi-final Germany Turbine Potsdam 0–0 5–1 f 5–1
Final Germany Frankfurt 2–0 ( Germany Munich)
2012–13 Round of 32 Finland Vantaa 7–0 f 5–0 12–0
Round of 16 Russia Zorky Krasnogorsk 9–0 f 2–0 11–0
Quarter-final Sweden Rosengård Malmö 3–0 5–0 f 8–0
Semi-final France Juvisy 6–1 3–0 f 9–1
Final Germany Wolfsburg 0–1 ( England London)
2013–14 Round of 32 Netherlands Twente Enschede 4–0 f 6–0 10–0
Round of 16 Germany Turbine Potsdam 1–0 f 1–2 2–2 ( a)
2014–15 Round of 32 Italy Brescia 5–0 f 9–0 14–0
Round of 16 France Paris Saint-Germain 1–1 f 0–1 1–2
2015–16 Round of 32 Poland Medyk Konin 6–0 f 3–0 9–0
Round of 16 Spain Atlético Madrid 3–1 f 6–0 9–1
Quarter-final Czech Republic Slavia Prague 0–0 9–1 f 9–1
Semi-final France Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 7–0 f 8–0
Final Germany Wolfsburg 1–1 ( a.e.t.) (4–3 p) ( Italy Reggio Emilia)
2016–17 Round of 32 Norway Avaldsnes 5–2 f 5–0 10–2
Round of 16 Switzerland Zürich 9–0 8–0 f 17–0
Quarter-final Germany Wolfsburg 2–0 f 0–1 2–1
Semi-final England Manchester City 3–1 f 0–1 3–2
Final France Paris Saint-Germain 0–0 ( a.e.t.) (7–6 p) ( Wales Cardiff)
2017–18 Round of 32 Poland Medyk Konin 5–0 f 9–0 14–0
Round of 16 Kazakhstan Kazygurt Shymkent 7–0 f 9–0 16–0
Quarter-final Spain Barcelona 1–0 2–1 f 3–1
Semi-final England Manchester City 0–0 f 1–0 1–0
Final Germany Wolfsburg 4–1 ( a.e.t.) ( Ukraine Kyiv)
2018–19 Round of 32 Norway Avaldsnes 2–0 f 5–0 7–0
Round of 16 Netherlands Ajax Amsterdam 4–0 f 9–0 13–0
Quarter-final Germany Wolfsburg 4–2 2–1 f 6–3
Semi-final England Chelsea 1–1 2–1 f 3–2
Final Spain Barcelona 4–1 ( Hungary Budapest)
2019–20 Round of 32 Russia Ryazan-VDV 9–0 f 7–0 16–0
Round of 16 Denmark Fortuna Hjørring 4–0 f 7–0 11–0
Quarter-final Germany Bayern Munich 2–1 ( Spain Bilbao)
Semi-final France Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 ( Spain Bilbao)
Final Germany Wolfsburg 3–1 ( Spain San Sebastián)
2020–21 Round of 32 Italy Juventus 3–2 f 3–0 6–2
Round of 16 Denmark Brøndby 3–1 2–0 f 5–1
Quarter-final France Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 f 1–2 2–2 ( a)
2021–22 Round 2 Spain Levante 2–1 f 2–1 4–2
Group D Germany Bayern Munich 0–1 2–1 1st
Portugal Benfica 5–0 5–0
Sweden BK Häcken 3–0 4–0
Quarter-final Italy Juventus 1–2 f 3–1 4–3
Semi-final France Paris Saint-Germain 2–1 3–2 f 5–3
Final Spain Barcelona 3–1 ( Italy Turin)

f First leg.

List of seasons

Top scorers in bold were also the top scorers in the Division 1 Féminine that season.

Champions Runners-up Promoted Relegated
Season League Cup Europe Top goalscorer(s)
Division Pos Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Name(s) Goals
2001–02 D1 3rd 22 14 2 6 53 26 +27 66 RU France Séverine Creuzet-Laplantes 17
2002–03 D1 2nd 22 15 4 3 60 19 +41 71 W France Sandrine Brétigny 26
2003–04 D1 2nd 22 14 4 4 52 25 +27 68 W France Claire Morel 18
2004–05 D1 3rd 22 15 2 5 50 20 +30 69 RU France Séverine Creuzet-Laplantes 13
2005–06 D1 3rd 22 10 8 4 34 12 +22 60 RU France Sandrine Brétigny 11
2006–07 D1 1st 22 20 1 1 116 9 +107 83 RU France Sandrine Brétigny 42
2007–08 D1 1st 22 18 4 0 93 4 +89 80 W Women's Cup SF France Sandrine Brétigny 25
2008–09 D1 1st 22 21 1 0 114 11 +103 86 SF Women's Cup SF Brazil Kátia 27
2009–10 D1 1st 22 18 2 2 93 11 +82 78 SF Champions League RU Brazil Kátia 17
2010–11 D1 1st 22 22 0 0 106 6 +100 88 QF Champions League W France Sandrine Brétigny 19
2011–12 D1 1st 22 19 3 0 119 3 +116 82 W Champions League W France Eugénie Le Sommer 22
2012–13 D1 1st 22 22 0 0 132 5 +127 88 W Champions League RU Sweden Lotta Schelin 24
2013–14 D1 1st 22 21 0 1 95 12 +83 85 W Champions League R16 France Eugénie Le Sommer
France Laëtitia Tonazzi
15
2014–15 D1 1st 22 22 0 0 147 6 +141 88 W Champions League R16 Sweden Lotta Schelin 34
2015–16 D1 1st 22 19 3 0 115 4 +111 82 W Champions League W Norway Ada Hegerberg 33
2016–17 D1 1st 22 21 0 1 103 6 +97 63 W Champions League W Norway Ada Hegerberg
France Eugénie Le Sommer
20
2017–18 D1 1st 22 21 1 0 104 5 +99 64 RU Champions League W Norway Ada Hegerberg 31
2018–19 D1 1st 22 20 2 0 89 9 +83 62 W Champions League W Norway Ada Hegerberg 20
2019–20 D1 1st 16 14 2 0 67 4 +63 44 W Champions League W Norway Ada Hegerberg 14
2020–21 D1 2nd 22 20 1 1 78 6 +72 61 DNF Champions League QF England Nikita Parris 13
2021–22 D1 1st 22 21 1 0 79 8 +71 64 R16 Champions League W United States Catarina Macario 14
2022–23 D1 1st 22 20 1 1 69 9 +60 61 W Champions League QF Denmark Signe Bruun 8

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Guillemet, Hugo (12 April 2023). "L'OL féminin bientôt vendu à Michele Kang, une femme d'affaires américaine". L'Equipe. Retrieved 14 April 2023.
  2. ^ Smith, Rory (17 May 2019). "The World's Most Dominant Team Isn't Who You Think". The New York Times. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  3. ^ Ingle, Sean (29 June 2019). "How Lucy Bronze was polished at Lyon, the ultimate finishing school | Sean Ingle". The Observer. ISSN  0029-7712. Retrieved 29 June 2019.
  4. ^ "Lyon and Potsdam make history". UEFA. 11 May 2010. Retrieved 16 June 2010.
  5. ^ "Potsdam hold nerve to claim European crown". UEFA. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 16 June 2010.
  6. ^ "2016–17 Women's Champions League Final Report". UEFA. Retrieved 26 May 2022.
  7. ^ "UEFA WOMEN'S CHAMPIONS LEAGUE 2014/15" (PDF). UEFA. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  8. ^ "Olympique Lyonnais Price Tag For John Textor: $846 Million". Forbes. 21 June 2022.
  9. ^ "L'OL officiellement vendu à l'Américain John Textor". L'Équipe (in French). 20 December 2022.
  10. ^ "OL Groupe and Michele Kang Form Global Multi-Team Women's Football Group" (Press release). Washington Spirit. 16 May 2023. Retrieved 16 May 2023.
  11. ^ Caron, Emily (16 May 2023). "Spirit's Michele Kang adds Lyonnais Feminin to Women's Soccer Venture". Sportico. Retrieved 16 May 2023.
  12. ^ Hess, AJ (16 May 2023). "Spirit owner Michele Kang buys Lyon to build first international women's soccer empire". Fast Company. Retrieved 16 May 2023.
  13. ^ a b Guillement, Hugo (16 May 2023). "Michele Kang, nouvelle actionnaire majoritaire de l'OL féminin : " Il n'est pas question de changer l'OL "" [Michele Kang, new majority shareholder of OL Women: "There is no question of changing OL"]. L'Équipe (in French). Retrieved 16 May 2023.
  14. ^ "Washington Spirit owner Kang to take over Lyon". Sports Business Journal. 16 May 2023. Retrieved 25 May 2023.
  15. ^ "Spirit owner Michele Kang attends Lyon women's match, hoists trophy with team amid takeover reports". The Athletic. 13 May 2023.
  16. ^ "EFFECTIF & STAFF". Olympique Lyonnais. Retrieved 18 February 2024.
  17. ^ "COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE | NOUVELLE ORGANISATION AU SEIN DU STAFF DE L'ÉQUIPE FÉMININE DE L'OL". Olympique Lyonnais. 14 June 2021. Retrieved 22 June 2021.
  18. ^ "Most consecutive association football victories (all competitions)". Guinness World Records.

External links